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Effect of altered dietary n-3 fatty acid intake upon plasma lipid fatty acid composition, conversion of [13C]alpha-linolenic acid to longer-chain fatty acids and partitioning towards beta-oxidation in older men

Effect of altered dietary n-3 fatty acid intake upon plasma lipid fatty acid composition, conversion of [13C]alpha-linolenic acid to longer-chain fatty acids and partitioning towards beta-oxidation in older men
Effect of altered dietary n-3 fatty acid intake upon plasma lipid fatty acid composition, conversion of [13C]alpha-linolenic acid to longer-chain fatty acids and partitioning towards beta-oxidation in older men
The effect of increased dietary intakes of alpha-linolenic acid (ALNA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for 2 months upon plasma lipid composition and capacity for conversion of ALNA to longer-chain metabolites was investigated in healthy men (52 (SD 12) years). After a 4-week baseline period when the subjects substituted a control spread, a test meal containing [U-(13)C]ALNA (700 mg) was consumed to measure conversion to EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA over 48 h. Subjects were then randomised to one of three groups for 8 weeks before repeating the tracer study: (1) continued on same intake (control, n 5); (2) increased ALNA intake (10 g/d, n 4); (3) increased EPA+DHA intake (1.5 g/d, n 5). At baseline, apparent fractional conversion of labelled ALNA was: EPA 2.80, DPA 1.20 and DHA 0.04 %. After 8 weeks on the control diet, plasma lipid composition and [(13)C]ALNA conversion remained unchanged compared with baseline. The high-ALNA diet resulted in raised plasma triacylglycerol-EPA and -DPA concentrations and phosphatidylcholine-EPA concentration, whilst [(13)C]ALNA conversion was similar to baseline. The high-(EPA+DHA) diet raised plasma phosphatidylcholine-EPA and -DHA concentrations, decreased [(13)C]ALNA conversion to EPA (2-fold) and DPA (4-fold), whilst [(13)C]ALNA conversion to DHA was unchanged. The dietary interventions did not alter partitioning of ALNA towards beta-oxidation. The present results indicate ALNA conversion was down-regulated by increased product (EPA+DHA) availability, but was not up-regulated by increased substrate (ALNA) consumption. This suggests regulation of ALNA conversion may limit the influence of variations in dietary n-3 fatty acid intake on plasma lipid compositions.
?-Linolenic acid, Stable isotope, Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, Man
0007-1145
311-321
Burdge, G. C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Finnegan, Y. E.
73d42e22-4484-491c-8cf2-758415e90827
Minihane, A. M.
29aefc8e-de98-454b-9577-278ba28c1eaf
Williams, C. M.
6cab1466-b505-4196-9391-18d68c124889
Wootton, S. A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
Burdge, G. C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Finnegan, Y. E.
73d42e22-4484-491c-8cf2-758415e90827
Minihane, A. M.
29aefc8e-de98-454b-9577-278ba28c1eaf
Williams, C. M.
6cab1466-b505-4196-9391-18d68c124889
Wootton, S. A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c

Burdge, G. C., Finnegan, Y. E., Minihane, A. M., Williams, C. M. and Wootton, S. A. (2003) Effect of altered dietary n-3 fatty acid intake upon plasma lipid fatty acid composition, conversion of [13C]alpha-linolenic acid to longer-chain fatty acids and partitioning towards beta-oxidation in older men. British Journal of Nutrition, 90 (2), 311-321. (doi:10.1079/BJN2003901). (PMID:12908891)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The effect of increased dietary intakes of alpha-linolenic acid (ALNA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for 2 months upon plasma lipid composition and capacity for conversion of ALNA to longer-chain metabolites was investigated in healthy men (52 (SD 12) years). After a 4-week baseline period when the subjects substituted a control spread, a test meal containing [U-(13)C]ALNA (700 mg) was consumed to measure conversion to EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA over 48 h. Subjects were then randomised to one of three groups for 8 weeks before repeating the tracer study: (1) continued on same intake (control, n 5); (2) increased ALNA intake (10 g/d, n 4); (3) increased EPA+DHA intake (1.5 g/d, n 5). At baseline, apparent fractional conversion of labelled ALNA was: EPA 2.80, DPA 1.20 and DHA 0.04 %. After 8 weeks on the control diet, plasma lipid composition and [(13)C]ALNA conversion remained unchanged compared with baseline. The high-ALNA diet resulted in raised plasma triacylglycerol-EPA and -DPA concentrations and phosphatidylcholine-EPA concentration, whilst [(13)C]ALNA conversion was similar to baseline. The high-(EPA+DHA) diet raised plasma phosphatidylcholine-EPA and -DHA concentrations, decreased [(13)C]ALNA conversion to EPA (2-fold) and DPA (4-fold), whilst [(13)C]ALNA conversion to DHA was unchanged. The dietary interventions did not alter partitioning of ALNA towards beta-oxidation. The present results indicate ALNA conversion was down-regulated by increased product (EPA+DHA) availability, but was not up-regulated by increased substrate (ALNA) consumption. This suggests regulation of ALNA conversion may limit the influence of variations in dietary n-3 fatty acid intake on plasma lipid compositions.

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More information

Published date: August 2003
Keywords: ?-Linolenic acid, Stable isotope, Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, Man
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383824
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383824
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 8d825e31-c6f3-4256-b7c2-ecfaec652516
ORCID for G. C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

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Date deposited: 25 Nov 2015 14:24
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:42

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Contributors

Author: G. C. Burdge ORCID iD
Author: Y. E. Finnegan
Author: A. M. Minihane
Author: C. M. Williams
Author: S. A. Wootton

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