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Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids in men and women

Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids in men and women
Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids in men and women
The purpose of this study was to determine whether adult humans can recycle carbon from alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) into saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated (MUFA) fatty acids. Six men and six women consumed 700 mg [U-13C]-18:3n-3. Blood was collected over 21 days and breath over 24h. [13C]-labelled SFA and MUFA were detected in plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) and triacylglycerol (TAG). Total labelled fatty acid incorporation into SFA and MUFA was five- and 25-fold greater in PC than TAG in men and women, respectively. [13C]-16:0 was the major labelled fatty acid in both fractions. Total [13C] incorporation into SFA and MUFA was 20% greater in men than women, and related positively (r(2) = 0.35, P<0.05) to the fractional recovery of labelled 18:3n-3 as 13CO2 on breath. These results suggest that the extent of partitioning towards beta-oxidation and carbon recycling may regulate the availability of 18:3n-3 for conversion to longer-chain fatty acids.
alpha-linolenic acid, Gender, Saturated fatty acid, Monounsaturated fatty acid, Stable isotope, Human
283-90
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Wootton, S.A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Wootton, S.A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c

Burdge, G.C. and Wootton, S.A. (2003) Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids in men and women. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 69 (4), 283-90. (doi:10.1016/S0952-3278(03)00111-X). (PMID:12907139)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether adult humans can recycle carbon from alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) into saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated (MUFA) fatty acids. Six men and six women consumed 700 mg [U-13C]-18:3n-3. Blood was collected over 21 days and breath over 24h. [13C]-labelled SFA and MUFA were detected in plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) and triacylglycerol (TAG). Total labelled fatty acid incorporation into SFA and MUFA was five- and 25-fold greater in PC than TAG in men and women, respectively. [13C]-16:0 was the major labelled fatty acid in both fractions. Total [13C] incorporation into SFA and MUFA was 20% greater in men than women, and related positively (r(2) = 0.35, P<0.05) to the fractional recovery of labelled 18:3n-3 as 13CO2 on breath. These results suggest that the extent of partitioning towards beta-oxidation and carbon recycling may regulate the availability of 18:3n-3 for conversion to longer-chain fatty acids.

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More information

Published date: October 2003
Keywords: alpha-linolenic acid, Gender, Saturated fatty acid, Monounsaturated fatty acid, Stable isotope, Human
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383825
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383825
PURE UUID: d42adcfa-3e29-4851-b5c1-ab9ef3a188dd
ORCID for G.C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Nov 2015 11:58
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:35

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