The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Beyond ‘Masala’: horror and science fiction in contemporary Bollywood

Beyond ‘Masala’: horror and science fiction in contemporary Bollywood
Beyond ‘Masala’: horror and science fiction in contemporary Bollywood
Since the early 1990s, Bollywood has witnessed a significant shift from its traditional ‘formulae’, particularly in terms of formal elements (i.e. narrative, themes, mise-en-scène) in its attempt to reach international audiences. The term Masala, often used to refer to all Bollywood films, has become one of the most popular genres of Bollywood. The ‘angry young man’ era of the 1970s and 1980s has lost its popularity in the last two decades as a self-conscious genre cinema has developed in Bollywood. This change has not only influenced genre conventions but also audience expectations. As a result, genres such as horror and science fiction have gained popularity within India and abroad. Despite changes in form and expectation, the critical discourse on Bollywood has mostly retained its focus on the genres of ‘classical’ Bollywood and its ‘golden era’. These shifts in Bollywood in the new millennium require re-visiting our understanding of this cinema. One of my central arguments is that horror and science fiction have developed through a process of Bollywoodization while the dominant discourse often credits Indianization as the main factor. Bollywoodization, in this case, refers to the transnational cinematic shifts in which genre conventions from other industries are appropriated to a specific Bollywood style. This thesis aims to expand the understanding of genre cinema in Bollywood whilst claiming it as what Tom Ryall has called a ‘cinema of genres’.
Shafiq, Zubair
ee60cead-9800-46f8-bbb2-21b3e4daa2ff
Shafiq, Zubair
ee60cead-9800-46f8-bbb2-21b3e4daa2ff
Bergfelder, Tim
fb4e3b67-06fd-4b9f-9a94-bc73a1c7c16d
Donnelly, Kevin
b31cebde-a9cf-48c9-a573-97782cd2a5c0

(2015) Beyond ‘Masala’: horror and science fiction in contemporary Bollywood. University of Southampton, Faculty of Humanities, Doctoral Thesis, 284pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, Bollywood has witnessed a significant shift from its traditional ‘formulae’, particularly in terms of formal elements (i.e. narrative, themes, mise-en-scène) in its attempt to reach international audiences. The term Masala, often used to refer to all Bollywood films, has become one of the most popular genres of Bollywood. The ‘angry young man’ era of the 1970s and 1980s has lost its popularity in the last two decades as a self-conscious genre cinema has developed in Bollywood. This change has not only influenced genre conventions but also audience expectations. As a result, genres such as horror and science fiction have gained popularity within India and abroad. Despite changes in form and expectation, the critical discourse on Bollywood has mostly retained its focus on the genres of ‘classical’ Bollywood and its ‘golden era’. These shifts in Bollywood in the new millennium require re-visiting our understanding of this cinema. One of my central arguments is that horror and science fiction have developed through a process of Bollywoodization while the dominant discourse often credits Indianization as the main factor. Bollywoodization, in this case, refers to the transnational cinematic shifts in which genre conventions from other industries are appropriated to a specific Bollywood style. This thesis aims to expand the understanding of genre cinema in Bollywood whilst claiming it as what Tom Ryall has called a ‘cinema of genres’.

Text
PhD-Thesis-Zubair-Shafiq.pdf - Other
Download (3MB)

More information

Published date: July 2015
Organisations: University of Southampton, Film

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383878
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383878
PURE UUID: 1b15b31e-4a25-4683-869d-71dae9fee306
ORCID for Tim Bergfelder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6585-6123

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Nov 2015 14:42
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 00:36

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×