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Molecular breeding for improved second generation bioenergy crops

Molecular breeding for improved second generation bioenergy crops
Molecular breeding for improved second generation bioenergy crops
There is increasing urgency to develop and deploy sustainable sources of energy to reduce our global dependency on finite, high-carbon fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic feedstocks, used in power and liquid fuel generation, are valuable sources of non-food plant biomass. They are cultivated with minimal inputs on marginal or degraded lands to prevent competition with arable agriculture and offer significant potential for sustainable intensification (the improvement of yield without the necessity for additional inputs) through advanced molecular breeding. This article explores progress made in next generation sequencing, advanced genotyping, association genetics, and genetic modification in second generation bioenergy production. Using poplar as an exemplar where most progress has been made, a suite of target traits is also identified giving insight into possible routes for crop improvement and deployment in the immediate future.
poplar, willow, miscanthus, switchgrass, dna technologies, next generation sequencing
1360-1385
43-54
Allwright, Michael R.
f6815c66-69b5-427b-b29d-c7e183cd91af
Taylor, Gail
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171
Allwright, Michael R.
f6815c66-69b5-427b-b29d-c7e183cd91af
Taylor, Gail
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171

Allwright, Michael R. and Taylor, Gail (2016) Molecular breeding for improved second generation bioenergy crops. Trends in Plant Science, 21 (1), 43-54.

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is increasing urgency to develop and deploy sustainable sources of energy to reduce our global dependency on finite, high-carbon fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic feedstocks, used in power and liquid fuel generation, are valuable sources of non-food plant biomass. They are cultivated with minimal inputs on marginal or degraded lands to prevent competition with arable agriculture and offer significant potential for sustainable intensification (the improvement of yield without the necessity for additional inputs) through advanced molecular breeding. This article explores progress made in next generation sequencing, advanced genotyping, association genetics, and genetic modification in second generation bioenergy production. Using poplar as an exemplar where most progress has been made, a suite of target traits is also identified giving insight into possible routes for crop improvement and deployment in the immediate future.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 2 November 2015
Published date: January 2016
Keywords: poplar, willow, miscanthus, switchgrass, dna technologies, next generation sequencing
Organisations: Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383929
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383929
ISSN: 1360-1385
PURE UUID: 3a9c43f0-67a5-4f16-9b80-e45a26572fee
ORCID for Gail Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8470-6390

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Nov 2015 13:53
Last modified: 25 May 2019 00:36

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Contributors

Author: Michael R. Allwright
Author: Gail Taylor ORCID iD

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