The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Perception of the pitch and naturalness of popular music by cochlear implant users

Perception of the pitch and naturalness of popular music by cochlear implant users
Perception of the pitch and naturalness of popular music by cochlear implant users
Objectives: To assess the perceived pitch and naturalness of popular music by cochlear implant (CI) users.


Methods: Eleven experienced post-lingually deafened adult CI users rated the pitch, naturalness, and clarity of a popular song with 10 frequency allocation settings, including the default. The alternative settings all had logarithmic frequency spacing and frequency shifts of less than one octave compared with the default map. For maps which were perceived as having incorrect pitch, participants adjusted the pitch of the song in real time using a slider, in order to normalize it, and the amount of adjustment was recorded.


Results: The default map was rated as having close to correct pitch. Naturalness rating was negatively correlated with basal shift from a baseline logarithmic map, which was the same as the default map for basal electrodes (R2 = 0.77). Ratings of the clarity of the lyrics were adversely affected by basal shift. The majority of participants were able to rate and adjust pitch appropriately. The frequency shift in the map was highly correlated with participants’ adjustments of the pitch slider (R2 = 0.94), but the adjustments were less than expected for the majority of participants.


Discussion: The pitch ratings for the default allocation suggest that participants have acclimatized to their processors’ frequency allocations. Adjustment of the pitch of the song was possible for the majority and suggested that all but one participant was experiencing frequency compression. Expansion of the frequency allocation might help to alleviate this.


Conclusion: Adjustment of the pitch of a popular song could be helpful for tuning CIs.
cochlear implant, music, pitch, frequency, sound quality, mapping, tuning
1467-0100
S79-S90
Grasmeder, M.L.
206e6b44-d1cd-43f5-99ac-588ab02d44ef
Verschuur, C.A.
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Grasmeder, M.L.
206e6b44-d1cd-43f5-99ac-588ab02d44ef
Verschuur, C.A.
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41

Grasmeder, M.L. and Verschuur, C.A. (2015) Perception of the pitch and naturalness of popular music by cochlear implant users. Cochlear Implants International, 16, supplement S3, S79-S90. (doi:10.1179/1467010015Z.000000000266). (PMID:26561891)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the perceived pitch and naturalness of popular music by cochlear implant (CI) users.


Methods: Eleven experienced post-lingually deafened adult CI users rated the pitch, naturalness, and clarity of a popular song with 10 frequency allocation settings, including the default. The alternative settings all had logarithmic frequency spacing and frequency shifts of less than one octave compared with the default map. For maps which were perceived as having incorrect pitch, participants adjusted the pitch of the song in real time using a slider, in order to normalize it, and the amount of adjustment was recorded.


Results: The default map was rated as having close to correct pitch. Naturalness rating was negatively correlated with basal shift from a baseline logarithmic map, which was the same as the default map for basal electrodes (R2 = 0.77). Ratings of the clarity of the lyrics were adversely affected by basal shift. The majority of participants were able to rate and adjust pitch appropriately. The frequency shift in the map was highly correlated with participants’ adjustments of the pitch slider (R2 = 0.94), but the adjustments were less than expected for the majority of participants.


Discussion: The pitch ratings for the default allocation suggest that participants have acclimatized to their processors’ frequency allocations. Adjustment of the pitch of the song was possible for the majority and suggested that all but one participant was experiencing frequency compression. Expansion of the frequency allocation might help to alleviate this.


Conclusion: Adjustment of the pitch of a popular song could be helpful for tuning CIs.

Text
__soton.ac.uk_ude_PersonalFiles_Users_mlf4_mydocuments_PhD work_CII Music and CIs paper_Music and CIs paper submission 31 March 2015.docx - Author's Original
Download (3MB)

More information

Published date: 12 November 2015
Keywords: cochlear implant, music, pitch, frequency, sound quality, mapping, tuning
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384074
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384074
ISSN: 1467-0100
PURE UUID: 2343b310-e53d-41a4-b6e8-955254fff7c8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Dec 2015 09:58
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 20:27

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×