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An analysis of the presentation of the equals sign in Grade 1 Greek textbooks

An analysis of the presentation of the equals sign in Grade 1 Greek textbooks
An analysis of the presentation of the equals sign in Grade 1 Greek textbooks
Young children often develop a partial, operational understanding of the equals sign that refers to completing an action, such as getting the answer to an addition or multiplication question, and fail to develop a relational understanding of the equals sign as a symbol that denotes equivalence. A partial view of the equals sign as an operator can be the result of primary-age pupils’ overexposure to canonical equations such as a+b=c. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the different syntaxes and formats used to present equality statements in the Grade 1 textbooks in Greece. The quantitative analysis reveals an overemphasis on presenting the equals sign within canonical equations. However, qualitative analysis reveals that the equals sign is first introduced in a context that conveys the idea of equivalence relation and is presented within an interesting mix of symbolic and non-symbolic contexts which may minimise the tendency to interpret the equals sign exclusively as an operator.
9780854329847
483-488
University of Southampton
Voutsina, Chronoula
bd9934e7-f8e0-4b82-a664-a1fe48850082
Voutsina, Chronoula
bd9934e7-f8e0-4b82-a664-a1fe48850082

Voutsina, Chronoula (2014) An analysis of the presentation of the equals sign in Grade 1 Greek textbooks. In, Proceedings of the International Conference on Mathematics Textbook Research and Development. (Proceedings of the International Conference on Mathematics Textbook Research and Development) International Conference on Mathematics Textbook Research and Development (31/07/14) Southampton. University of Southampton, pp. 483-488.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Young children often develop a partial, operational understanding of the equals sign that refers to completing an action, such as getting the answer to an addition or multiplication question, and fail to develop a relational understanding of the equals sign as a symbol that denotes equivalence. A partial view of the equals sign as an operator can be the result of primary-age pupils’ overexposure to canonical equations such as a+b=c. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the different syntaxes and formats used to present equality statements in the Grade 1 textbooks in Greece. The quantitative analysis reveals an overemphasis on presenting the equals sign within canonical equations. However, qualitative analysis reveals that the equals sign is first introduced in a context that conveys the idea of equivalence relation and is presented within an interesting mix of symbolic and non-symbolic contexts which may minimise the tendency to interpret the equals sign exclusively as an operator.

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ICMT Conference soton 2014 Charis submission - Other
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Published date: 29 July 2014
Venue - Dates: International Conference on Mathematics Textbook Research and Development, Southampton, United Kingdom, 2014-07-29 - 2014-07-31
Organisations: Mathematics, Science & Health Education

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384077
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384077
ISBN: 9780854329847
PURE UUID: 2dfeb976-bd7e-40fe-b3b8-93dbec35ae3b
ORCID for Chronoula Voutsina: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2196-5816

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Date deposited: 03 Dec 2015 16:33
Last modified: 29 Jan 2019 01:34

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