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Quantifying integrated proteomic responses to iron stress in the globally important marine diazotroph trichodesmium

Quantifying integrated proteomic responses to iron stress in the globally important marine diazotroph trichodesmium
Quantifying integrated proteomic responses to iron stress in the globally important marine diazotroph trichodesmium
Trichodesmium is a biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium, responsible for a significant proportion of the annual ‘new’ nitrogen introduced into the global ocean. These non-heterocystous filamentous diazotrophs employ a potentially unique strategy of near-concurrent nitrogen fixation and oxygenic photosynthesis, potentially burdening Trichodesmium with a particularly high iron requirement due to the iron-binding proteins involved in these processes. Iron availability may therefore have a significant influence on the biogeography of Trichodesmium. Previous investigations of molecular responses to iron stress in this keystone marine microbe have largely been targeted. Here a holistic approach was taken using a label-free quantitative proteomics technique (MSE) to reveal a sophisticated multi-faceted proteomic response of Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 to iron stress. Increased abundances of proteins known to be involved in acclimation to iron stress and proteins known or predicted to be involved in iron uptake were observed, alongside decreases in the abundances of iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. Preferential loss of proteins with a high iron content contributed to overall reductions of 55–60% in estimated proteomic iron requirements. Changes in the abundances of iron-binding proteins also suggested the potential importance of alternate photosynthetic pathways as Trichodesmium reallocates the limiting resource under iron stress. Trichodesmium therefore displays a significant and integrated proteomic response to iron availability that likely contributes to the ecological success of this species in the ocean.
1932-6203
1-24
Snow, Joseph T.
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Polyviou, Despo
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Skipp, Paul
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Chrismas, Nathan A.M.
090d4db9-3168-472e-921b-7ff44e4068b5
Hitchcock, Andrew
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Geider, Richard
8d10d630-0e84-4e10-ada3-db921eeb769b
Moore, C. Mark
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Bibby, Thomas S.
e04ea079-dd90-4ead-9840-00882de27ebd
Snow, Joseph T.
74cb4d5c-2d12-4707-920f-95f230f42cfc
Polyviou, Despo
7fcaf51c-0615-4967-a180-f5405f7b8070
Skipp, Paul
1ba7dcf6-9fe7-4b5c-a9d0-e32ed7f42aa5
Chrismas, Nathan A.M.
090d4db9-3168-472e-921b-7ff44e4068b5
Hitchcock, Andrew
aeca86f3-e8cf-47d1-9338-e82630fb868e
Geider, Richard
8d10d630-0e84-4e10-ada3-db921eeb769b
Moore, C. Mark
7ec80b7b-bedc-4dd5-8924-0f5d01927b12
Bibby, Thomas S.
e04ea079-dd90-4ead-9840-00882de27ebd

Snow, Joseph T., Polyviou, Despo, Skipp, Paul, Chrismas, Nathan A.M., Hitchcock, Andrew, Geider, Richard, Moore, C. Mark and Bibby, Thomas S. (2015) Quantifying integrated proteomic responses to iron stress in the globally important marine diazotroph trichodesmium. PLoS ONE, 10 (11), 1-24. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0142626).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Trichodesmium is a biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium, responsible for a significant proportion of the annual ‘new’ nitrogen introduced into the global ocean. These non-heterocystous filamentous diazotrophs employ a potentially unique strategy of near-concurrent nitrogen fixation and oxygenic photosynthesis, potentially burdening Trichodesmium with a particularly high iron requirement due to the iron-binding proteins involved in these processes. Iron availability may therefore have a significant influence on the biogeography of Trichodesmium. Previous investigations of molecular responses to iron stress in this keystone marine microbe have largely been targeted. Here a holistic approach was taken using a label-free quantitative proteomics technique (MSE) to reveal a sophisticated multi-faceted proteomic response of Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 to iron stress. Increased abundances of proteins known to be involved in acclimation to iron stress and proteins known or predicted to be involved in iron uptake were observed, alongside decreases in the abundances of iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. Preferential loss of proteins with a high iron content contributed to overall reductions of 55–60% in estimated proteomic iron requirements. Changes in the abundances of iron-binding proteins also suggested the potential importance of alternate photosynthetic pathways as Trichodesmium reallocates the limiting resource under iron stress. Trichodesmium therefore displays a significant and integrated proteomic response to iron availability that likely contributes to the ecological success of this species in the ocean.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 October 2015
Published date: 12 November 2015
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384137
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384137
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: a3112b3d-7502-47ff-9ac5-c7d881efa5d5
ORCID for Paul Skipp: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2995-2959
ORCID for C. Mark Moore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9541-6046

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2015 09:55
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Joseph T. Snow
Author: Despo Polyviou
Author: Paul Skipp ORCID iD
Author: Nathan A.M. Chrismas
Author: Andrew Hitchcock
Author: Richard Geider
Author: C. Mark Moore ORCID iD
Author: Thomas S. Bibby

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