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Relapse in multiple sclerosis

Relapse in multiple sclerosis
Relapse in multiple sclerosis
Relapse of multiple sclerosis is a patient reported, or objectively observed, event typical of an acute inflammatory demyelinating event in the central nervous system, current or historical, with a duration of at least 24 hours.
The differential diagnosis of a relapse includes alternative neurological diagnoses, pseudo-relapses, short lived paroxysmal symptoms, day to day fluctuations, and functional symptoms.
Clinically significant or severe relapses may benefit from treatment with corticosteroid for five days.
Documentation and timely communication of the relapse to the patient’s multiple sclerosis specialist service, such as through the multiple sclerosis specialist nurse, is important, to enable timely decisions on immunotherapy initiation or escalation.
Non-adherence with immunotherapy is under-recognised by both patients and doctors.
0959-8138
h1765
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b
Ward-Abel, Nicki
03d0b4e8-bdb3-4192-9a92-1872094808d9
Heesen, Christoph
1f483c47-8edd-4655-aec3-db243d891310
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b
Ward-Abel, Nicki
03d0b4e8-bdb3-4192-9a92-1872094808d9
Heesen, Christoph
1f483c47-8edd-4655-aec3-db243d891310

Galea, Ian, Ward-Abel, Nicki and Heesen, Christoph (2015) Relapse in multiple sclerosis. British Medical Journal, 350, h1765. (doi:10.1136/bmj.h1765). (PMID:25872511)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Relapse of multiple sclerosis is a patient reported, or objectively observed, event typical of an acute inflammatory demyelinating event in the central nervous system, current or historical, with a duration of at least 24 hours.
The differential diagnosis of a relapse includes alternative neurological diagnoses, pseudo-relapses, short lived paroxysmal symptoms, day to day fluctuations, and functional symptoms.
Clinically significant or severe relapses may benefit from treatment with corticosteroid for five days.
Documentation and timely communication of the relapse to the patient’s multiple sclerosis specialist service, such as through the multiple sclerosis specialist nurse, is important, to enable timely decisions on immunotherapy initiation or escalation.
Non-adherence with immunotherapy is under-recognised by both patients and doctors.

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Published date: 2015
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384270
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384270
ISSN: 0959-8138
PURE UUID: 7b3e70ac-f27c-4209-ba59-213c6558a08d
ORCID for Ian Galea: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1268-5102

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Nov 2015 09:36
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 20:12

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