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The role of information in supporting self-care in vascular conditions: a conceptual and empirical review

The role of information in supporting self-care in vascular conditions: a conceptual and empirical review
The role of information in supporting self-care in vascular conditions: a conceptual and empirical review
Self-care has the potential to make a significant contribution to vascular conditions, but engagement with self-care support has been limited. Lack of relevant information is highlighted by patients and policy-makers as an important barrier to effective self-care, and information provides a potentially efficient platform for changing behaviour. However, work within the social sciences has generally seen information as a necessary but insufficient driver of health behaviours. Furthermore, some groups (such as the socially disadvantaged) are expected to be less amenable to information interventions. We conducted an integrated conceptual and empirical review on information-based interventions for people with vascular disease (diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease). We reviewed conceptual and empirical work concerning the role and impact of information in self-care support to generate an explanatory framework to determine why information was effective or ineffective in encouraging self-care in patients with vascular conditions. This involved mapping relevant theories and models linking information and self-care. We also explored published systematic reviews of educational interventions in diabetes, coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease to examine the role of information and evidence concerning its effectiveness and impact in different patient populations. The conceptual review identified variation among information interventions in terms of type, function, and their relationship to behaviour change techniques and psychological mediators of behaviour change. Key moderators of the effect of information included types of disorder, and patient capacity and resources. A wealth of educational interventions exists for diabetes and heart conditions, but the precise components of these interventions that are effective are difficult to identify. There is little evidence concerning optimal ways of tailoring interventions for socially disadvantaged groups other than ethnic minorities. A focus on printed information may not provide access to effective methods of information delivery (e.g. tailored information, use of narratives and user generated content). Developing a framework for the effective use of information needs to take account the full range of the factors identified
chronic illness management, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, information, interventions
0966-0410
449-459
Blickem, Christian
cc3228ac-f56e-4dca-9aae-cbb6bfac4fb3
Bower, Peter
ec553157-a170-4219-8b55-2df813846e44
Protheroe, Joanne
ef666365-4f77-4c8c-9471-967b084dff81
Kennedy, Anne
d1c93666-c487-4c08-be0a-8114ac6480ca
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Sanders, Caroline
1121a9ec-e719-489a-9ffd-ae8cb6e49a78
Kirk, Sue
bb78bede-b432-48d9-baef-9a317805f55d
Chew-Graham, Carolyn
530beade-2b1c-4eea-846f-1fcef0585ca5
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Blickem, Christian
cc3228ac-f56e-4dca-9aae-cbb6bfac4fb3
Bower, Peter
ec553157-a170-4219-8b55-2df813846e44
Protheroe, Joanne
ef666365-4f77-4c8c-9471-967b084dff81
Kennedy, Anne
d1c93666-c487-4c08-be0a-8114ac6480ca
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Sanders, Caroline
1121a9ec-e719-489a-9ffd-ae8cb6e49a78
Kirk, Sue
bb78bede-b432-48d9-baef-9a317805f55d
Chew-Graham, Carolyn
530beade-2b1c-4eea-846f-1fcef0585ca5
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7

Blickem, Christian, Bower, Peter, Protheroe, Joanne, Kennedy, Anne, Vassilev, Ivaylo, Sanders, Caroline, Kirk, Sue, Chew-Graham, Carolyn and Rogers, Anne (2011) The role of information in supporting self-care in vascular conditions: a conceptual and empirical review. Health & Social Care in the Community, 19 (5), 449-459. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00975.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Self-care has the potential to make a significant contribution to vascular conditions, but engagement with self-care support has been limited. Lack of relevant information is highlighted by patients and policy-makers as an important barrier to effective self-care, and information provides a potentially efficient platform for changing behaviour. However, work within the social sciences has generally seen information as a necessary but insufficient driver of health behaviours. Furthermore, some groups (such as the socially disadvantaged) are expected to be less amenable to information interventions. We conducted an integrated conceptual and empirical review on information-based interventions for people with vascular disease (diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease). We reviewed conceptual and empirical work concerning the role and impact of information in self-care support to generate an explanatory framework to determine why information was effective or ineffective in encouraging self-care in patients with vascular conditions. This involved mapping relevant theories and models linking information and self-care. We also explored published systematic reviews of educational interventions in diabetes, coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease to examine the role of information and evidence concerning its effectiveness and impact in different patient populations. The conceptual review identified variation among information interventions in terms of type, function, and their relationship to behaviour change techniques and psychological mediators of behaviour change. Key moderators of the effect of information included types of disorder, and patient capacity and resources. A wealth of educational interventions exists for diabetes and heart conditions, but the precise components of these interventions that are effective are difficult to identify. There is little evidence concerning optimal ways of tailoring interventions for socially disadvantaged groups other than ethnic minorities. A focus on printed information may not provide access to effective methods of information delivery (e.g. tailored information, use of narratives and user generated content). Developing a framework for the effective use of information needs to take account the full range of the factors identified

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 October 2010
Published date: 2011
Keywords: chronic illness management, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, information, interventions
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384380
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384380
ISSN: 0966-0410
PURE UUID: 65cec7b6-9918-4529-a1ef-d24d779bfd62

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Date deposited: 11 Dec 2015 15:44
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:56

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Contributors

Author: Christian Blickem
Author: Peter Bower
Author: Joanne Protheroe
Author: Anne Kennedy
Author: Ivaylo Vassilev
Author: Caroline Sanders
Author: Sue Kirk
Author: Carolyn Chew-Graham
Author: Anne Rogers

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