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The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians

The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians
The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians
Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms' thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts
hydrostatic pressure, temperature, physiological scope
1-7
Morris, J.P.
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Thatje, S.
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Cottin, D.
4fed3555-5a51-44a0-85ba-e4fcae754b7d
Oliphant, A.
a080aa80-9deb-4e70-aadb-7c0b02600735
Brown, A.
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Shillito, B.
4f84c279-55ee-4aa4-9c48-21b15bd71603
Ravaux, J.
c1ae600d-cc08-4f99-9c29-bc719963c46f
Hauton, C.
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Morris, J.P.
7060ae12-d0fd-41a5-89df-83870b59be31
Thatje, S.
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Cottin, D.
4fed3555-5a51-44a0-85ba-e4fcae754b7d
Oliphant, A.
a080aa80-9deb-4e70-aadb-7c0b02600735
Brown, A.
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Shillito, B.
4f84c279-55ee-4aa4-9c48-21b15bd71603
Ravaux, J.
c1ae600d-cc08-4f99-9c29-bc719963c46f
Hauton, C.
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331

Morris, J.P., Thatje, S., Cottin, D., Oliphant, A., Brown, A., Shillito, B., Ravaux, J. and Hauton, C. (2015) The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians. Royal Society Open Science, 2 (11), 1-7. (doi:10.1098/rsos.150472).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms' thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 October 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 November 2015
Published date: November 2015
Keywords: hydrostatic pressure, temperature, physiological scope
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384409
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384409
PURE UUID: dde8e012-7fda-4e6b-8879-bf48bae0cc3d
ORCID for C. Hauton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2313-4226

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Date deposited: 26 Nov 2015 10:08
Last modified: 29 Aug 2019 00:51

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Contributors

Author: J.P. Morris
Author: S. Thatje
Author: D. Cottin
Author: A. Oliphant
Author: A. Brown
Author: B. Shillito
Author: J. Ravaux
Author: C. Hauton ORCID iD

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