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Automated reconstruction of tree and canopy structure for modeling the internal canopy radiation regime

Automated reconstruction of tree and canopy structure for modeling the internal canopy radiation regime
Automated reconstruction of tree and canopy structure for modeling the internal canopy radiation regime
Understanding canopy radiation regimes is critical to successfully modeling vegetation growth and function. For instance, the vertical distribution of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) affects vegetation growth, informative upon carbon and energy cycling. Availing upon advances in information capture and computing power, geometrically explicit modeling of forest structure becomes increasingly possible. A primary challenge however is acquiring the forest mensuration data required to parameterize these models and the related automation of modeling forest structure. In this research, to address these issues we employ a novel and automated approach that capitalizes upon the rich information afforded by ground-based laser scanning technology. The method is implemented in two steps: in the first step, geometric explicit models of canopy structure are created from the ground-based laser scanning data. These geometric explicit models are used to simulate the vertical range to first hit. In the second step, we derive canopy gap probability from full waveform laser scanning data which have been used in a number of studies for characterization of radiation transmission (Jupp et al., 2009; Yang et al., 2010) and do not require any geometric explicit modeling. The radiative consistency of the geometric explicit models from step 1 is validated against the gap probabilities of step 2. The results show a strong relationship between the radiative transmission properties of the geometric models and canopy gap probabilities at plot level (R = 0.91 to 0.97), while the geometric models suggest the additional benefit to serve as a bridge in scaling between shoot level and canopy level radiation. ?? 2013 Elsevier Inc.
canopy structure, explicit geometric, laser scanning, Modeling, photosynthetically active radiation, ray tracing
0034-4257
286-300
Van Leeuwen, Martin
d0b420da-8c90-41c3-a047-eabd517dbd0b
Coops, Nicholas C.
5511e778-fec2-4f54-8708-de65ba5a0992
Hilker, Thomas
c7fb75b8-320d-49df-84ba-96c9ee523d40
Wulder, Michael A.
13414360-db3d-4d88-a76d-ccffd69d0084
Newnham, Glenn J.
461f980e-fd0f-40f2-98c0-2f33f8611b44
Culvenor, Darius S.
5a9065a0-c5a2-4220-b704-5e241b5b988d
Van Leeuwen, Martin
d0b420da-8c90-41c3-a047-eabd517dbd0b
Coops, Nicholas C.
5511e778-fec2-4f54-8708-de65ba5a0992
Hilker, Thomas
c7fb75b8-320d-49df-84ba-96c9ee523d40
Wulder, Michael A.
13414360-db3d-4d88-a76d-ccffd69d0084
Newnham, Glenn J.
461f980e-fd0f-40f2-98c0-2f33f8611b44
Culvenor, Darius S.
5a9065a0-c5a2-4220-b704-5e241b5b988d

Van Leeuwen, Martin, Coops, Nicholas C., Hilker, Thomas, Wulder, Michael A., Newnham, Glenn J. and Culvenor, Darius S. (2013) Automated reconstruction of tree and canopy structure for modeling the internal canopy radiation regime. Remote Sensing of Environment, 136, 286-300. (doi:10.1016/j.rse.2013.04.019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Understanding canopy radiation regimes is critical to successfully modeling vegetation growth and function. For instance, the vertical distribution of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) affects vegetation growth, informative upon carbon and energy cycling. Availing upon advances in information capture and computing power, geometrically explicit modeling of forest structure becomes increasingly possible. A primary challenge however is acquiring the forest mensuration data required to parameterize these models and the related automation of modeling forest structure. In this research, to address these issues we employ a novel and automated approach that capitalizes upon the rich information afforded by ground-based laser scanning technology. The method is implemented in two steps: in the first step, geometric explicit models of canopy structure are created from the ground-based laser scanning data. These geometric explicit models are used to simulate the vertical range to first hit. In the second step, we derive canopy gap probability from full waveform laser scanning data which have been used in a number of studies for characterization of radiation transmission (Jupp et al., 2009; Yang et al., 2010) and do not require any geometric explicit modeling. The radiative consistency of the geometric explicit models from step 1 is validated against the gap probabilities of step 2. The results show a strong relationship between the radiative transmission properties of the geometric models and canopy gap probabilities at plot level (R = 0.91 to 0.97), while the geometric models suggest the additional benefit to serve as a bridge in scaling between shoot level and canopy level radiation. ?? 2013 Elsevier Inc.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 June 2013
Published date: September 2013
Keywords: canopy structure, explicit geometric, laser scanning, Modeling, photosynthetically active radiation, ray tracing
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation, Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384655
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384655
ISSN: 0034-4257
PURE UUID: bd158361-d2ca-4500-b868-14a5b83d13f4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jan 2016 12:25
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 20:03

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