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Sociology in the 1980s: the rise of gender (and intersectionality)

Sociology in the 1980s: the rise of gender (and intersectionality)
Sociology in the 1980s: the rise of gender (and intersectionality)
The social, economic and political context of the 1980s in Britain shaped the contributions to the journal, and the early part of the decade was marked by emphasis on the interrelations between class and gender. The introduction of this e-special discusses the increasing importance of gender in sociological analysis in the 1980s. This development is related to a shift from production to consumption and a growing interest in life-style leading to the debate around “the end of class”, the “cultural turn” and “identity politics”. We assess the influence of articles published in the 1980s and how sociology – both the discipline and the journal – have changed since these articles have been published. The selected articles provide a historical perspective and are – as we argue – still highly relevant for the current state of the discipline and sociological debate. They illustrate the evolution of British sociology, from emphasis on class analysis in the 1970s towards the growing prominence of intersectionality and subjectivity in the 1990s and beyond. Feminist theory and research in the 1980s within and beyond Sociology indicate the importance and utility of intersectionality, even if the terminology has shifted, and the decade resulted in considerable advances in terms of the prominence, legitimacy and sophistication of gender analysis
Roth, Silke
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Dashper, Katherine
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Roth, Silke
cd4e63d8-bd84-45c1-b317-5850d2a362b6
Dashper, Katherine
3cc7c3a0-ac37-4f7d-9ce0-e765688b6d4c

Roth, Silke and Dashper, Katherine (2016) Sociology in the 1980s: the rise of gender (and intersectionality). Sociology. (doi:10.1177/0038038515620359).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The social, economic and political context of the 1980s in Britain shaped the contributions to the journal, and the early part of the decade was marked by emphasis on the interrelations between class and gender. The introduction of this e-special discusses the increasing importance of gender in sociological analysis in the 1980s. This development is related to a shift from production to consumption and a growing interest in life-style leading to the debate around “the end of class”, the “cultural turn” and “identity politics”. We assess the influence of articles published in the 1980s and how sociology – both the discipline and the journal – have changed since these articles have been published. The selected articles provide a historical perspective and are – as we argue – still highly relevant for the current state of the discipline and sociological debate. They illustrate the evolution of British sociology, from emphasis on class analysis in the 1970s towards the growing prominence of intersectionality and subjectivity in the 1990s and beyond. Feminist theory and research in the 1980s within and beyond Sociology indicate the importance and utility of intersectionality, even if the terminology has shifted, and the decade resulted in considerable advances in terms of the prominence, legitimacy and sophistication of gender analysis

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Gender in the 1980s-accepted 4 November 2015.pdf - Other
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Accepted/In Press date: November 2015
Published date: February 2016
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384826
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384826
PURE UUID: 1adabed5-1c67-408f-be5d-4d50ad6545d1
ORCID for Silke Roth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8760-0505

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Date deposited: 08 Dec 2015 11:55
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:06

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Contributors

Author: Silke Roth ORCID iD
Author: Katherine Dashper

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