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Improving social and communication skills of adult Arabs with ASD through the use of social media technologies

Improving social and communication skills of adult Arabs with ASD through the use of social media technologies
Improving social and communication skills of adult Arabs with ASD through the use of social media technologies
People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) find it hard to communicate and interact with other people. Although technology has been involved in supporting people with ASD in developed countries, research on such technologies has been mainly related to Western culture. Arab adults with ASD require support for improving their social skills. However, cultural differences could limit the usability of existing technologies. The proposed study aims to investigate the use of social networks for supporting Arab adults with High-Functioning Autism or Asperger syndrome in order to improve their abilities in social situations such as family relations and friendships, considering the influence of culture and tradition views on the usability and sociability of social media technologies.
accessibility, usability, autism spectrum disorder, arabs, adults, social media, technology, social skills communication
0302-9743
478-485
Mashat, Alaa
5f322347-fd67-467d-9f99-a72ae1b4e96d
Wald, Mike
90577cfd-35ae-4e4a-9422-5acffecd89d5
Parsons, Sarah
5af3382f-cda3-489c-a336-9604f3c04d7d
Mashat, Alaa
5f322347-fd67-467d-9f99-a72ae1b4e96d
Wald, Mike
90577cfd-35ae-4e4a-9422-5acffecd89d5
Parsons, Sarah
5af3382f-cda3-489c-a336-9604f3c04d7d

Mashat, Alaa, Wald, Mike and Parsons, Sarah (2014) Improving social and communication skills of adult Arabs with ASD through the use of social media technologies. [in special issue: Computers Helping People with Special Needs: 14th International Conference, ICCHP 2014, Paris, France, July 9-11, 2014, Proceedings, Part I] Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 8547, 478-485. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-08596-8_75).

Record type: Article

Abstract

People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) find it hard to communicate and interact with other people. Although technology has been involved in supporting people with ASD in developed countries, research on such technologies has been mainly related to Western culture. Arab adults with ASD require support for improving their social skills. However, cultural differences could limit the usability of existing technologies. The proposed study aims to investigate the use of social networks for supporting Arab adults with High-Functioning Autism or Asperger syndrome in order to improve their abilities in social situations such as family relations and friendships, considering the influence of culture and tradition views on the usability and sociability of social media technologies.

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More information

Published date: 9 July 2014
Additional Information: Print ISBN 978-3-319-08595-1. Online ISBN 978-3-319-08596-8
Keywords: accessibility, usability, autism spectrum disorder, arabs, adults, social media, technology, social skills communication
Organisations: Southampton Education School, Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385097
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385097
ISSN: 0302-9743
PURE UUID: 6feff701-ae8a-4290-9247-6733ea37ae36
ORCID for Sarah Parsons: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2542-4745

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Dec 2015 17:14
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:45

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Contributors

Author: Alaa Mashat
Author: Mike Wald
Author: Sarah Parsons ORCID iD

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