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The acoustic bubble: oceanic bubble acoustics and ultrasonic cleaning

The acoustic bubble: oceanic bubble acoustics and ultrasonic cleaning
The acoustic bubble: oceanic bubble acoustics and ultrasonic cleaning
Bubbles interact strongly with sound fields. Gas bubbles in the oceangenerate sound as they are produced by breaking waves, rainfall, methane seeps, etc., and such emissions can be used to size and count the bubbles present. However after production, when the pulsations of such bubbles have damped away, they are silent unless re-excited. These, and other bubbles in the ocean that do not generally make significant passive sound emissions (such as those that appear through exsolution, and a range of biological processes including decomposition, photosynthesis, respiration and digestion) can still strongly influence applied sound fields through scattering, and changing the sound speed and absorption from that which would be expected in bubble-free water. This paper discusses how these phenomena might be associated with bubble netting by cetaceans. When driven with appropriate acoustic fields, bubbles can change their surrounding environment, and examples of this are shown through the generation of cleaning in an ultrasonically-activated stream of cold water, without additives.
1939-800X
1-15
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae

Leighton, Timothy G. (2015) The acoustic bubble: oceanic bubble acoustics and ultrasonic cleaning. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, 24 (70006), 1-15. (doi:10.1121/2.0000121).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bubbles interact strongly with sound fields. Gas bubbles in the oceangenerate sound as they are produced by breaking waves, rainfall, methane seeps, etc., and such emissions can be used to size and count the bubbles present. However after production, when the pulsations of such bubbles have damped away, they are silent unless re-excited. These, and other bubbles in the ocean that do not generally make significant passive sound emissions (such as those that appear through exsolution, and a range of biological processes including decomposition, photosynthesis, respiration and digestion) can still strongly influence applied sound fields through scattering, and changing the sound speed and absorption from that which would be expected in bubble-free water. This paper discusses how these phenomena might be associated with bubble netting by cetaceans. When driven with appropriate acoustic fields, bubbles can change their surrounding environment, and examples of this are shown through the generation of cleaning in an ultrasonically-activated stream of cold water, without additives.

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Accepted/In Press date: 4 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 December 2015
Published date: December 2015
Organisations: Acoustics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385231
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385231
ISSN: 1939-800X
PURE UUID: ba5c2ca9-c5f1-4972-812a-98b568459ff5
ORCID for Timothy G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2016 15:39
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 02:02

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