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Soliciting additional concerns in the primary care consultation and the utility of a brief communication intervention to aid solicitation: a qualitative study

Soliciting additional concerns in the primary care consultation and the utility of a brief communication intervention to aid solicitation: a qualitative study
Soliciting additional concerns in the primary care consultation and the utility of a brief communication intervention to aid solicitation: a qualitative study
Objective: To investigate the perspectives of general practitioners (GPs) on the practice of soliciting additional concerns (ACs) and the acceptability and utility of two brief interventions (prompts) designed to aid the solicitation.

Methods: Eighteen GPs participating in a feasibility randomised controlled trial were interviewed. Interviews were semi-structured and audio-recorded. Data were analysed using a Framework Approach.

Results: Participants perceived eliciting ACs as important for: reducing the need for multiple visits, identifying serious illness early, and increasing patient and GP satisfaction. GPs found the prompts easy to use and some continued their use after the study had ended to aid time management. Others noted similarities between the intervention and their usual practice. Nevertheless, soliciting ACs in every consultation was not unanimously supported.

Conclusion: The prompts were acceptable to GPs within a trial context, but there was disagreement as to whether ACs should be solicited routinely. Some GPs considered the intervention to aid their prioritisation efficiency within consultations.

Practice implications: Some GPs will find prompts which encourage ACs to be solicited early in the consultation enable them to better organise priorities and manage time-limited consultations more effectively.
primary care, communication, patient concerns, qualitative, uk, framework approach
0738-3991
1-9
Summers, Rachael
811d6b74-d5f4-4e92-a507-9bdca978fda5
Moore, Michael
1be81dad-7120-45f0-bbed-f3b0cc0cfe99
Ekberg, Stuart
aa5f1f2e-a910-4917-b6bb-754d5ff85843
Chew-Graham, Carolyn A.
28f3f383-6b7f-492f-9ffa-8422d7239c9c
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Stevenson, Fiona
881eb2a9-d7a8-449d-be50-ead6fda5cd3e
Brindle, Lucy
17158264-2a99-4786-afc0-30990240436c
Leydon, Geraldine
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40
Summers, Rachael
811d6b74-d5f4-4e92-a507-9bdca978fda5
Moore, Michael
1be81dad-7120-45f0-bbed-f3b0cc0cfe99
Ekberg, Stuart
aa5f1f2e-a910-4917-b6bb-754d5ff85843
Chew-Graham, Carolyn A.
28f3f383-6b7f-492f-9ffa-8422d7239c9c
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Stevenson, Fiona
881eb2a9-d7a8-449d-be50-ead6fda5cd3e
Brindle, Lucy
17158264-2a99-4786-afc0-30990240436c
Leydon, Geraldine
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40

Summers, Rachael, Moore, Michael, Ekberg, Stuart, Chew-Graham, Carolyn A., Little, Paul, Stevenson, Fiona, Brindle, Lucy and Leydon, Geraldine (2016) Soliciting additional concerns in the primary care consultation and the utility of a brief communication intervention to aid solicitation: a qualitative study. Patient Education and Counseling, 1-9. (doi:10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the perspectives of general practitioners (GPs) on the practice of soliciting additional concerns (ACs) and the acceptability and utility of two brief interventions (prompts) designed to aid the solicitation.

Methods: Eighteen GPs participating in a feasibility randomised controlled trial were interviewed. Interviews were semi-structured and audio-recorded. Data were analysed using a Framework Approach.

Results: Participants perceived eliciting ACs as important for: reducing the need for multiple visits, identifying serious illness early, and increasing patient and GP satisfaction. GPs found the prompts easy to use and some continued their use after the study had ended to aid time management. Others noted similarities between the intervention and their usual practice. Nevertheless, soliciting ACs in every consultation was not unanimously supported.

Conclusion: The prompts were acceptable to GPs within a trial context, but there was disagreement as to whether ACs should be solicited routinely. Some GPs considered the intervention to aid their prioritisation efficiency within consultations.

Practice implications: Some GPs will find prompts which encourage ACs to be solicited early in the consultation enable them to better organise priorities and manage time-limited consultations more effectively.

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Summers-2015-Soliciting additional concers.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 January 2016
Keywords: primary care, communication, patient concerns, qualitative, uk, framework approach
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385274
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385274
ISSN: 0738-3991
PURE UUID: 184beb10-5835-4e60-9341-e7a008cd5d76
ORCID for Rachael Summers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9060-0584
ORCID for Michael Moore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5127-4509
ORCID for Lucy Brindle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8933-3754
ORCID for Geraldine Leydon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5986-3300

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Date deposited: 18 Jan 2016 14:44
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:57

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Contributors

Author: Rachael Summers ORCID iD
Author: Michael Moore ORCID iD
Author: Stuart Ekberg
Author: Carolyn A. Chew-Graham
Author: Paul Little
Author: Fiona Stevenson
Author: Lucy Brindle ORCID iD

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