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Exercise for men with prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Exercise for men with prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Exercise for men with prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Context: Exercise could be beneficial for prostate cancer survivors. However, no systematic review across cancer stages and treatment types addressing potential benefits and harms exists to date.

Objective: To assess the effects of exercise on cancer-specific quality of life and adverse events in prostate cancer trials.

Evidence acquisition: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro. We also searched grey literature databases, including trial registers. Searches were from database inception to March 2015. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for meta-analysis.

Evidence synthesis: We included 16 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1574 men with prostate cancer. Follow-up varied from 8 wk to 12 mo. RCTs involved men with stage I–IV cancers. A high risk of bias was frequently due to problematic intervention adherence. Seven trials involving 912 men measured cancer-specific quality of life. Pooling of the data from these seven trials revealed no significant effect on this outcome (SMD 0.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] –0.08 to 0.34, median follow-up 12 wk). Sensitivity analysis of studies that were judged to be of high quality indicated a moderate positive effect estimate (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.08–0.58; median follow-up 12 wk). Similar beneficial effects were seen for cancer-specific fatigue, submaximal fitness, and lower body strength. We found no evidence of benefit for disease progression, cardiovascular health, or sexual function. There were no deaths attributable to exercise interventions. Other serious adverse events (eg, myocardial infarction) were equivalent to those seen in controls.

Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that exercise interventions improve cancer-specific quality of life, cancer-specific fatigue, submaximal fitness, and lower body strength.

Patient summary: This review shows that exercise/physical activity interventions can improve quality of life, fatigue, fitness, and function for men with prostate cancer.
exercise, prostate cancer, quality of life, fatigue, adverse effects
0302-2838
693-703
Bourke, Liam
2688f8d1-e1c8-4a37-a2c7-bfa16165b80d
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Steed, Liz
ae5bda07-eb40-4bd8-9ed9-5ed9987af034
Hooper, Richard
e45dd04b-e192-4bcc-bbb6-4cca077232bf
Carter, Anouska
1506d3b2-d9e3-4b31-9bd6-dbd64dedb6c7
Catto, James
974045b3-8c1e-4b46-920c-6efa4e02ac85
Albertsen, Peter C.
268428d2-8161-46ef-9fd1-8446ca40d288
Tombal, Bertrand
ed982df2-92f9-4650-9dba-0bb7227abd64
Payne, Heather A.
aef578cc-b692-4435-b460-7b906b185bd0
Rosario, Derek J.
692789e4-89a4-4d0d-9cbb-94473a1765c4
Bourke, Liam
2688f8d1-e1c8-4a37-a2c7-bfa16165b80d
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Steed, Liz
ae5bda07-eb40-4bd8-9ed9-5ed9987af034
Hooper, Richard
e45dd04b-e192-4bcc-bbb6-4cca077232bf
Carter, Anouska
1506d3b2-d9e3-4b31-9bd6-dbd64dedb6c7
Catto, James
974045b3-8c1e-4b46-920c-6efa4e02ac85
Albertsen, Peter C.
268428d2-8161-46ef-9fd1-8446ca40d288
Tombal, Bertrand
ed982df2-92f9-4650-9dba-0bb7227abd64
Payne, Heather A.
aef578cc-b692-4435-b460-7b906b185bd0
Rosario, Derek J.
692789e4-89a4-4d0d-9cbb-94473a1765c4

Bourke, Liam, Smith, Dianna, Steed, Liz, Hooper, Richard, Carter, Anouska, Catto, James, Albertsen, Peter C., Tombal, Bertrand, Payne, Heather A. and Rosario, Derek J. (2016) Exercise for men with prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Urology, 69 (4), 693-703. (doi:10.1016/j.eururo.2015.10.047).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Context: Exercise could be beneficial for prostate cancer survivors. However, no systematic review across cancer stages and treatment types addressing potential benefits and harms exists to date.

Objective: To assess the effects of exercise on cancer-specific quality of life and adverse events in prostate cancer trials.

Evidence acquisition: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro. We also searched grey literature databases, including trial registers. Searches were from database inception to March 2015. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for meta-analysis.

Evidence synthesis: We included 16 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1574 men with prostate cancer. Follow-up varied from 8 wk to 12 mo. RCTs involved men with stage I–IV cancers. A high risk of bias was frequently due to problematic intervention adherence. Seven trials involving 912 men measured cancer-specific quality of life. Pooling of the data from these seven trials revealed no significant effect on this outcome (SMD 0.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] –0.08 to 0.34, median follow-up 12 wk). Sensitivity analysis of studies that were judged to be of high quality indicated a moderate positive effect estimate (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.08–0.58; median follow-up 12 wk). Similar beneficial effects were seen for cancer-specific fatigue, submaximal fitness, and lower body strength. We found no evidence of benefit for disease progression, cardiovascular health, or sexual function. There were no deaths attributable to exercise interventions. Other serious adverse events (eg, myocardial infarction) were equivalent to those seen in controls.

Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that exercise interventions improve cancer-specific quality of life, cancer-specific fatigue, submaximal fitness, and lower body strength.

Patient summary: This review shows that exercise/physical activity interventions can improve quality of life, fatigue, fitness, and function for men with prostate cancer.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 October 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 November 2015
Published date: April 2016
Keywords: exercise, prostate cancer, quality of life, fatigue, adverse effects
Organisations: Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385324
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385324
ISSN: 0302-2838
PURE UUID: 93de29ca-473a-444b-a2ca-583cd956d25c
ORCID for Dianna Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0650-6606

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2016 09:17
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:32

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