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Spatial distribution of emergency obstetric and newborn care services in Ghana: using the evidence to plan interventions

Spatial distribution of emergency obstetric and newborn care services in Ghana: using the evidence to plan interventions
Spatial distribution of emergency obstetric and newborn care services in Ghana: using the evidence to plan interventions
Objective: To provide clear policy directions for gaps in the provision of signal function services and sub-regions requiring priority attention using data from the 2010 Ghana Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) survey.

Methods: Using 2010 survey data, the fraction of facilities with only one or two signal functions missing was calculated for each facility type and EmONC designation. Thematic maps were used to provide insight into inequities in service provision.

Results: Of 1159 maternity facilities, 89 provided all the necessary basic or comprehensive EmONC signal functions 3 months prior to the 2010 survey. Only 21% of facility-based births were in fully functioning EmONC facilities, but an additional 30% occurred in facilities missing one or two basic signal functions—most often assisted vaginal delivery and removal of retained products. Tackling these missing signal functions would extend births taking place in fully functioning facilities to over 50%. Subnational analyses based on estimated total pregnancies in each district revealed a pattern of inequity in service provision across the country.

Conclusion: Upgrading facilities missing only one or two signal functions will allow Ghana to meet international standards for availability of EmONC services. Reducing maternal deaths will require high national priority given to addressing inequities in the distribution of EmONC services.
0020-7292
130-134
Bosomprah, Samuel
9cf510bb-1817-4fcb-b8dc-6250845a7515
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred
8e7a4177-1620-4a2b-a860-baa1c5e29bb8
Aboagye, Patrick
dea8b3b4-41ad-4c4c-8317-d8f1de5f8b66
Matthews, Zoe
ebaee878-8cb8-415f-8aa1-3af2c3856f55
Bosomprah, Samuel
9cf510bb-1817-4fcb-b8dc-6250845a7515
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred
8e7a4177-1620-4a2b-a860-baa1c5e29bb8
Aboagye, Patrick
dea8b3b4-41ad-4c4c-8317-d8f1de5f8b66
Matthews, Zoe
ebaee878-8cb8-415f-8aa1-3af2c3856f55

Bosomprah, Samuel, Tatem, Andrew J., Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred, Aboagye, Patrick and Matthews, Zoe (2016) Spatial distribution of emergency obstetric and newborn care services in Ghana: using the evidence to plan interventions. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 132 (1), 130-134. (doi:10.1016/j.ijgo.2015.11.004). (PMID:26725855)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To provide clear policy directions for gaps in the provision of signal function services and sub-regions requiring priority attention using data from the 2010 Ghana Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) survey.

Methods: Using 2010 survey data, the fraction of facilities with only one or two signal functions missing was calculated for each facility type and EmONC designation. Thematic maps were used to provide insight into inequities in service provision.

Results: Of 1159 maternity facilities, 89 provided all the necessary basic or comprehensive EmONC signal functions 3 months prior to the 2010 survey. Only 21% of facility-based births were in fully functioning EmONC facilities, but an additional 30% occurred in facilities missing one or two basic signal functions—most often assisted vaginal delivery and removal of retained products. Tackling these missing signal functions would extend births taking place in fully functioning facilities to over 50%. Subnational analyses based on estimated total pregnancies in each district revealed a pattern of inequity in service provision across the country.

Conclusion: Upgrading facilities missing only one or two signal functions will allow Ghana to meet international standards for availability of EmONC services. Reducing maternal deaths will require high national priority given to addressing inequities in the distribution of EmONC services.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 5 December 2015
Published date: January 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography, Global Env Change & Earth Observation, WorldPop, Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385356
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385356
ISSN: 0020-7292
PURE UUID: ace1fc6e-3e37-4330-a461-e079f91de008
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2016 11:34
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:36

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Contributors

Author: Samuel Bosomprah
Author: Andrew J. Tatem ORCID iD
Author: Winfred Dotse-Gborgbortsi
Author: Patrick Aboagye
Author: Zoe Matthews

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