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Virus evolution and transmission in an ever more connected world

Virus evolution and transmission in an ever more connected world
Virus evolution and transmission in an ever more connected world
The frequency and global impact of infectious disease outbreaks, particularly those caused by emerging viruses, demonstrate the need for a better understanding of how spatial ecology and pathogen evolution jointly shape epidemic dynamics. Advances in computational techniques and the increasing availability of genetic and geospatial data are helping to address this problem, particularly when both information sources are combined. Here, we review research at the intersection of evolutionary biology, human geography and epidemiology that is working towards an integrated view of spatial incidence, host mobility and viral genetic diversity. We first discuss how empirical studies have combined viral spatial and genetic data, focusing particularly on the contribution of evolutionary analyses to epidemiology and disease control. Second, we explore the interplay between virus evolution and global dispersal in more depth for two pathogens: human influenza A virus and chikungunya virus. We discuss the opportunities for future research arising from new analyses of human transportation and trade networks, as well as the associated challenges in accessing and sharing relevant spatial and genetic data.
virus, epidemiology, geography, evolution, phylogenetics, transmission
0962-8452
1-10
Pybus, Oliver G.
5fa128e1-8eb8-4d38-b925-1d7869a07f99
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Lemey, Philippe
207ba0de-f285-4098-9643-53646088c8cc
Pybus, Oliver G.
5fa128e1-8eb8-4d38-b925-1d7869a07f99
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Lemey, Philippe
207ba0de-f285-4098-9643-53646088c8cc

Pybus, Oliver G., Tatem, Andrew J. and Lemey, Philippe (2015) Virus evolution and transmission in an ever more connected world. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 282 (1821), 1-10. (doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.2878). (PMID:26702033)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The frequency and global impact of infectious disease outbreaks, particularly those caused by emerging viruses, demonstrate the need for a better understanding of how spatial ecology and pathogen evolution jointly shape epidemic dynamics. Advances in computational techniques and the increasing availability of genetic and geospatial data are helping to address this problem, particularly when both information sources are combined. Here, we review research at the intersection of evolutionary biology, human geography and epidemiology that is working towards an integrated view of spatial incidence, host mobility and viral genetic diversity. We first discuss how empirical studies have combined viral spatial and genetic data, focusing particularly on the contribution of evolutionary analyses to epidemiology and disease control. Second, we explore the interplay between virus evolution and global dispersal in more depth for two pathogens: human influenza A virus and chikungunya virus. We discuss the opportunities for future research arising from new analyses of human transportation and trade networks, as well as the associated challenges in accessing and sharing relevant spatial and genetic data.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 April 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 December 2015
Published date: December 2015
Keywords: virus, epidemiology, geography, evolution, phylogenetics, transmission
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation, WorldPop, Geography & Environment, Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385358
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385358
ISSN: 0962-8452
PURE UUID: aece3e6c-ea10-49de-962f-403c86da19c8
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2016 11:45
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:35

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