The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination

Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination
Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination
Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections1. In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show `malariogenic potential,' a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination.
2050-084X
1-20
Reiner, Robert C.
1c284400-d853-4cb1-93c5-cc3ac6f6fa49
Le Manach, Arnaud
dd586cd6-a08a-42b9-a643-bfe30003c2ad
Kunene, Simon
dc9b3e73-951a-49f8-a94c-ff8605de502c
Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu
398d93e3-f1ee-4302-a976-980aa08e6031
Hsiang, Michelle S.
0370cbd3-3379-4af8-8856-87416dfdce61
Perkins, T. Alex
6a3765cc-2473-4aff-8735-b8174b64b34e
Greenhouse, Bryan
53ea169c-97f0-4e20-9d89-74567442da71
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Cohen, Justin M.
7de99049-a4c3-4fa1-8ff8-cc1bc5dcdfc9
Smith, David L.
5c918948-ded2-42d8-82c1-a746a4bc3b6e
Reiner, Robert C.
1c284400-d853-4cb1-93c5-cc3ac6f6fa49
Le Manach, Arnaud
dd586cd6-a08a-42b9-a643-bfe30003c2ad
Kunene, Simon
dc9b3e73-951a-49f8-a94c-ff8605de502c
Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu
398d93e3-f1ee-4302-a976-980aa08e6031
Hsiang, Michelle S.
0370cbd3-3379-4af8-8856-87416dfdce61
Perkins, T. Alex
6a3765cc-2473-4aff-8735-b8174b64b34e
Greenhouse, Bryan
53ea169c-97f0-4e20-9d89-74567442da71
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Cohen, Justin M.
7de99049-a4c3-4fa1-8ff8-cc1bc5dcdfc9
Smith, David L.
5c918948-ded2-42d8-82c1-a746a4bc3b6e

Reiner, Robert C., Le Manach, Arnaud, Kunene, Simon, Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu, Hsiang, Michelle S., Perkins, T. Alex, Greenhouse, Bryan, Tatem, Andrew J., Cohen, Justin M. and Smith, David L. (2015) Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination. eLife, 4, 1-20.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections1. In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show `malariogenic potential,' a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination.

PDF
eLife.09520.full.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (4MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 November 2015
Published date: 29 December 2015
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation, WorldPop, Geography & Environment, Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385387
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385387
ISSN: 2050-084X
PURE UUID: 04e0d491-4cba-4904-80af-ca55766db00a
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2016 14:45
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:28

Export record

Contributors

Author: Robert C. Reiner
Author: Arnaud Le Manach
Author: Simon Kunene
Author: Nyasatu Ntshalintshali
Author: Michelle S. Hsiang
Author: T. Alex Perkins
Author: Bryan Greenhouse
Author: Andrew J. Tatem ORCID iD
Author: Justin M. Cohen
Author: David L. Smith

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×