The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Global variation in grip strength: a systematic review and meta-analysis of normative data

Global variation in grip strength: a systematic review and meta-analysis of normative data
Global variation in grip strength: a systematic review and meta-analysis of normative data
Background: weak grip strength is a key component of sarcopenia and is associated with subsequent disability and mortality. We have recently established life course normative data for grip strength in Great Britain, but it is unclear whether the cut points we derived for weak grip strength are suitable for use in other settings. Our objective was to investigate differences in grip strength by world region using our data as a reference standard.
Methods: we searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for reporting age- and gender-stratified normative data for grip strength. We extracted each item of normative data and converted it on to a Z-score scale relative to our British centiles. We performed meta-regression to pool the Z-scores and compare them by world region.
Findings: our search returned 806 abstracts. Sixty papers met inclusion criteria and reported on 63 different samples. Seven UN regions were represented, although most samples (n = 44) were based in developed regions. We extracted 726 normative data items relating to 96,537 grip strength observations. Normative data from developed regions were broadly similar to our British centiles, with a pooled Z-score 0.12 SDs (95% CI: 0.07, 0.17) above the corresponding British centiles. By comparison, normative data from developing regions were clearly lower, with a pooled Z-score of −0.85 SDs (95% CI: −0.94, −0.76).
Interpretation: our findings support the use of our British grip strength centiles and their associated cut points in consensus definitions for sarcopenia and frailty across developed regions, but highlight the need for different cut points in developing regions.Our search returned 806 abstracts. Sixty papers met inclusion criteria and reported on 63 different samples. Seven UN regions were represented although most samples (n=44) were based in developed regions. We extracted 726 normative data items relating to 96,537 grip strength observations. Normative data from developed regions were broadly similar to our British centiles, with a pooled Z-score 0.12 SDs (95% CI: 0.07, 0.17) above the corresponding British centiles. By comparison, normative data from developing regions were clearly lower, with a pooled Z-score of -0.85 SDs (95% CI: -0.94, -0.76).

Interpretation

Our findings support the use of our British grip strength centiles and their associated cut points in consensus definitions for sarcopenia and frailty across developed regions, but highlight the need for different cut points in developing regions.
0002-0729
209-216
Dodds, R.M.
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Syddall, H.E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Cooper, R.
6cd7b578-a1fa-4511-bc7d-9addc4baf372
Kuh, D.
6c5d95a4-433d-4895-bd95-86a7d5fe76a5
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Dodds, R.M.
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Syddall, H.E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Cooper, R.
6cd7b578-a1fa-4511-bc7d-9addc4baf372
Kuh, D.
6c5d95a4-433d-4895-bd95-86a7d5fe76a5
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb

Dodds, R.M., Syddall, H.E., Cooper, R., Kuh, D., Cooper, C. and Aihie Sayer, Avan (2016) Global variation in grip strength: a systematic review and meta-analysis of normative data. Age and Ageing, 45 (2), 209-216. (doi:10.1093/ageing/afv192).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: weak grip strength is a key component of sarcopenia and is associated with subsequent disability and mortality. We have recently established life course normative data for grip strength in Great Britain, but it is unclear whether the cut points we derived for weak grip strength are suitable for use in other settings. Our objective was to investigate differences in grip strength by world region using our data as a reference standard.
Methods: we searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for reporting age- and gender-stratified normative data for grip strength. We extracted each item of normative data and converted it on to a Z-score scale relative to our British centiles. We performed meta-regression to pool the Z-scores and compare them by world region.
Findings: our search returned 806 abstracts. Sixty papers met inclusion criteria and reported on 63 different samples. Seven UN regions were represented, although most samples (n = 44) were based in developed regions. We extracted 726 normative data items relating to 96,537 grip strength observations. Normative data from developed regions were broadly similar to our British centiles, with a pooled Z-score 0.12 SDs (95% CI: 0.07, 0.17) above the corresponding British centiles. By comparison, normative data from developing regions were clearly lower, with a pooled Z-score of −0.85 SDs (95% CI: −0.94, −0.76).
Interpretation: our findings support the use of our British grip strength centiles and their associated cut points in consensus definitions for sarcopenia and frailty across developed regions, but highlight the need for different cut points in developing regions.Our search returned 806 abstracts. Sixty papers met inclusion criteria and reported on 63 different samples. Seven UN regions were represented although most samples (n=44) were based in developed regions. We extracted 726 normative data items relating to 96,537 grip strength observations. Normative data from developed regions were broadly similar to our British centiles, with a pooled Z-score 0.12 SDs (95% CI: 0.07, 0.17) above the corresponding British centiles. By comparison, normative data from developing regions were clearly lower, with a pooled Z-score of -0.85 SDs (95% CI: -0.94, -0.76).

Interpretation

Our findings support the use of our British grip strength centiles and their associated cut points in consensus definitions for sarcopenia and frailty across developed regions, but highlight the need for different cut points in developing regions.

Text
Manuscript revised.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (307kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: October 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 January 2016
Published date: March 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385494
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385494
ISSN: 0002-0729
PURE UUID: c8099146-123e-49b0-a5f6-96baca66982b
ORCID for R.M. Dodds: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4968-7678
ORCID for H.E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2016 15:12
Last modified: 29 Jul 2020 01:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: R.M. Dodds ORCID iD
Author: H.E. Syddall ORCID iD
Author: R. Cooper
Author: D. Kuh
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Avan Aihie Sayer

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×