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Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions

Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions
Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions
Listeria monoctyogenes is a foodborne pathogen containing the surface protein, internalin A (InlA). The expression of this protein permits the invasion of L. monocytogenes into intestinal epithelial cells expressing the receptor E-cadherin, thus crossing the intestinal barrier and resulting in listerosis. The main aim of this work was to investigate InlA levels in different L. monocytogenes strains in both planktonic and sessile states using an anti-InlA antibody. Biofilms were grown in high and low nutrient environments on glass, stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study demonstrated that InlA levels varied greatly between strains and serotypes of L. monocytogenes. However, the serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b and 4b, associated with the largest number of outbreaks of listerosis consistently showed the highest InlA levels, regardless of nutrient content or planktonic or sessile state. Differences in InlA levels were also observed in biofilms grown on different surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and PTFE, with a significant reduction in InlA levels observed in biofilms on PTFE. Interestingly, although a large number of the total cells observed in biofilms formed in tap-water were non-cultivable, the virulence factor, InlA, was expressed at levels between 78 and 85%, thus indicating that these cells may still be virulent. A greater understanding of the factors that affect the levels of InlA on the surface of L. monocytogenes, is essential in the appreciation of the role of InlA in the persistence of biofilms containing L. monocytogenes and their potential to cause food borne disease.
internalin A, listeria monocytogenes, biofilms, planktonic cells
0168-1605
50-55
Gilmartin, Niamh
464e0bd3-7740-4789-884d-ec101bc1667b
Gião, Maria S.
5638b770-3681-48b2-a9ae-9152b36ac504
Keevil, Charles W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
O'Kennedy, Richard
d1196faa-86b1-4529-9a7f-5e39b09fd3f5
Gilmartin, Niamh
464e0bd3-7740-4789-884d-ec101bc1667b
Gião, Maria S.
5638b770-3681-48b2-a9ae-9152b36ac504
Keevil, Charles W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
O'Kennedy, Richard
d1196faa-86b1-4529-9a7f-5e39b09fd3f5

Gilmartin, Niamh, Gião, Maria S., Keevil, Charles W. and O'Kennedy, Richard (2016) Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 219, 50-55. (doi:10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2015.12.004). (PMID:26724402)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Listeria monoctyogenes is a foodborne pathogen containing the surface protein, internalin A (InlA). The expression of this protein permits the invasion of L. monocytogenes into intestinal epithelial cells expressing the receptor E-cadherin, thus crossing the intestinal barrier and resulting in listerosis. The main aim of this work was to investigate InlA levels in different L. monocytogenes strains in both planktonic and sessile states using an anti-InlA antibody. Biofilms were grown in high and low nutrient environments on glass, stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study demonstrated that InlA levels varied greatly between strains and serotypes of L. monocytogenes. However, the serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b and 4b, associated with the largest number of outbreaks of listerosis consistently showed the highest InlA levels, regardless of nutrient content or planktonic or sessile state. Differences in InlA levels were also observed in biofilms grown on different surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and PTFE, with a significant reduction in InlA levels observed in biofilms on PTFE. Interestingly, although a large number of the total cells observed in biofilms formed in tap-water were non-cultivable, the virulence factor, InlA, was expressed at levels between 78 and 85%, thus indicating that these cells may still be virulent. A greater understanding of the factors that affect the levels of InlA on the surface of L. monocytogenes, is essential in the appreciation of the role of InlA in the persistence of biofilms containing L. monocytogenes and their potential to cause food borne disease.

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Accepted/In Press date: 11 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 December 2015
Published date: 16 February 2016
Keywords: internalin A, listeria monocytogenes, biofilms, planktonic cells
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385653
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385653
ISSN: 0168-1605
PURE UUID: 6543388b-3146-4f35-8c37-dc23c41bc794
ORCID for Charles W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

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Date deposited: 19 Jan 2016 16:43
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:51

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