The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Five decades of hierarchical modulation and its benefits in relay-aided networking

Five decades of hierarchical modulation and its benefits in relay-aided networking
Five decades of hierarchical modulation and its benefits in relay-aided networking
Hierarchical modulation (HM), which is also known as layered modulation, has been widely adopted across the telecommunication industry. Its strict backward compatibility with single-layer modems and its low complexity facilitate the seamless upgrading of wireless communication services. The specific features of HM may be conveniently exploited for improving the throughput/information-rate of the system without requiring any extra bandwidth, while its complexity may even be lower than that of the equivalent system relying on conventional modulation schemes. As a recent research trend, the potential employment of HM in the context of cooperative communications has also attracted substantial research interests. Motivated by the lower complexity and higher flexibility of HM, we provide a comprehensive survey and conclude with a range of promising future research directions. Our contribution is the conception of a new cooperative communication paradigm relying on turbo trellis-coded modulation-aided twin-layer HM-16QAM and the analytical performance investigation of a four-node cooperative communication network employing a novel opportunistic routing algorithm. The specific performance characteristics evaluated include the distribution of delay, the outage probability, the transmit power of each node, the average packet power consumption, and the system throughput. The simulation results have demonstrated that when transmitting the packets formed by layered modulated symbol streams, our opportunistic routing algorithm is capable of reducing the transmit power required for each node in the network compared with that of the system using the traditional opportunistic routing algorithm. We have also illustrated that the minimum packet power consumption of our system using our opportunistic routing algorithm is also lower than that of the system using the traditional opportunistic routing algorithm.
ad hoc network, coded modulation, cooperative communication, hierarchical modulation, opportunistic routing
2891-2921
Sun, Hua
2e2bad09-8ba9-4d9b-afa8-2a6a290eeaa2
Dong, Chen
dac9f067-33fb-47a2-b789-b3d131d8d866
Ng, Soon Xin
e19a63b0-0f12-4591-ab5f-554820d5f78c
Hanzo, Lajos
66e7266f-3066-4fc0-8391-e000acce71a1
Sun, Hua
2e2bad09-8ba9-4d9b-afa8-2a6a290eeaa2
Dong, Chen
dac9f067-33fb-47a2-b789-b3d131d8d866
Ng, Soon Xin
e19a63b0-0f12-4591-ab5f-554820d5f78c
Hanzo, Lajos
66e7266f-3066-4fc0-8391-e000acce71a1

Sun, Hua, Dong, Chen, Ng, Soon Xin and Hanzo, Lajos (2015) Five decades of hierarchical modulation and its benefits in relay-aided networking. IEEE Access, 3, 2891-2921. (doi:10.1109/ACCESS.2015.2510702).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Hierarchical modulation (HM), which is also known as layered modulation, has been widely adopted across the telecommunication industry. Its strict backward compatibility with single-layer modems and its low complexity facilitate the seamless upgrading of wireless communication services. The specific features of HM may be conveniently exploited for improving the throughput/information-rate of the system without requiring any extra bandwidth, while its complexity may even be lower than that of the equivalent system relying on conventional modulation schemes. As a recent research trend, the potential employment of HM in the context of cooperative communications has also attracted substantial research interests. Motivated by the lower complexity and higher flexibility of HM, we provide a comprehensive survey and conclude with a range of promising future research directions. Our contribution is the conception of a new cooperative communication paradigm relying on turbo trellis-coded modulation-aided twin-layer HM-16QAM and the analytical performance investigation of a four-node cooperative communication network employing a novel opportunistic routing algorithm. The specific performance characteristics evaluated include the distribution of delay, the outage probability, the transmit power of each node, the average packet power consumption, and the system throughput. The simulation results have demonstrated that when transmitting the packets formed by layered modulated symbol streams, our opportunistic routing algorithm is capable of reducing the transmit power required for each node in the network compared with that of the system using the traditional opportunistic routing algorithm. We have also illustrated that the minimum packet power consumption of our system using our opportunistic routing algorithm is also lower than that of the system using the traditional opportunistic routing algorithm.

Text
access-hanzo-2510702-proof.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (17MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 December 2015
Keywords: ad hoc network, coded modulation, cooperative communication, hierarchical modulation, opportunistic routing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385685
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385685
PURE UUID: ad952132-b0a8-45cc-b61c-13930282ca41
ORCID for Soon Xin Ng: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0930-7194
ORCID for Lajos Hanzo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2636-5214

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jan 2016 10:08
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:50

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×