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A fresh look at the dark side of contemporary careers: toward a realistic discourse

A fresh look at the dark side of contemporary careers: toward a realistic discourse
A fresh look at the dark side of contemporary careers: toward a realistic discourse
In this paper we propose that careers be considered as both offering promise and the source of potential disillusionment. While the changing nature of careers and of career management requires a comprehensive perspective to highlight the characteristics and nature of careers in their entirety, most published work predominantly addresses the positive aspects of careers, leaving their darker dynamics almost untouched. We argue that while career scholars tend to clothe such concerns in euphemistic terms, contemporary career experiences may often be quite dark and include a number of undesired consequences. By linking selected career constructs and notions of organizational dark sides, we aim to advance a more balanced framework, offering a career perspective that consists of opportunities versus threats, truth versus untruth and positive versus negative aspects, all of which are inevitably embedded in careers. Thus, we call for career conceptualization and research to be less normatively biased and prescriptive and to be more grounded in reality.
1045-3172
1-18
Baruch, Yehuda
25b89777-def4-4958-afdc-0ceab43efe8a
Vardi, Yoav
9283859f-2c8f-409f-9d7d-36c3ea2d9ed2
Baruch, Yehuda
25b89777-def4-4958-afdc-0ceab43efe8a
Vardi, Yoav
9283859f-2c8f-409f-9d7d-36c3ea2d9ed2

Baruch, Yehuda and Vardi, Yoav (2015) A fresh look at the dark side of contemporary careers: toward a realistic discourse. British Journal of Management, 1-18. (doi:10.1111/1467-8551.12107).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this paper we propose that careers be considered as both offering promise and the source of potential disillusionment. While the changing nature of careers and of career management requires a comprehensive perspective to highlight the characteristics and nature of careers in their entirety, most published work predominantly addresses the positive aspects of careers, leaving their darker dynamics almost untouched. We argue that while career scholars tend to clothe such concerns in euphemistic terms, contemporary career experiences may often be quite dark and include a number of undesired consequences. By linking selected career constructs and notions of organizational dark sides, we aim to advance a more balanced framework, offering a career perspective that consists of opportunities versus threats, truth versus untruth and positive versus negative aspects, all of which are inevitably embedded in careers. Thus, we call for career conceptualization and research to be less normatively biased and prescriptive and to be more grounded in reality.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 8 June 2015
Organisations: Southampton Business School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385780
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385780
ISSN: 1045-3172
PURE UUID: 7d6eddef-71b7-412d-ae32-f44a82787379
ORCID for Yehuda Baruch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0678-6273

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Date deposited: 22 Jan 2016 12:19
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:36

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