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Could in-home sensors surpass human observation of people with Parkinson’s at high risk of falling? An ethnographic study

Could in-home sensors surpass human observation of people with Parkinson’s at high risk of falling? An ethnographic study
Could in-home sensors surpass human observation of people with Parkinson’s at high risk of falling? An ethnographic study
Self-report underpins our understanding of falls among people with Parkinson’s (PwP) as they largely happen unwitnessed at home. In this qualitative study, we used an ethnographic approach to investigate which in-home sensors, placed where, could gather useful data about fall risk. Over six weeks, we observed five independently mobile PwP at high risk of falling, at home. We made field notes about falls (prior events and concerns) and recorded movement with video, Kinect and wearable sensors. The three women and two men (aged 71 to 79 years) had moderate or severe Parkinson’s, were dependent on others and highly sedentary. We most commonly noted balance protection, loss and restoration during chair transfers, walks across open spaces and through gaps, turns, steps up and down and tasks in standing (all evident walking between chair and stairs, for example). Our unobtrusive sensors were acceptable to participants: they could detect instability during everyday activity at home and potentially guide intervention. Monitoring the route between chair and stairs is likely to inform without invading the privacy of people at high risk of falling, with very limited mobility, who spend most of the day in their sitting rooms.
2314-6133
1-15
Stack, E.
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King, R.
ebc7577a-49ce-4d81-b318-97370c9c3df2
Janko, B.
ce1d99b2-e8d3-467f-8257-28f577e2ee60
Burnett, M.
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Hammersley, N.
bd489944-41ab-422a-8743-794d1f031b32
Agarwal, V.
a9136686-fe91-4945-a02f-4d129e387197
Hannuna, S.
cc346a10-385f-41f9-b829-bbb56edf31ff
Burrows, A.
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Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
King, R.
ebc7577a-49ce-4d81-b318-97370c9c3df2
Janko, B.
ce1d99b2-e8d3-467f-8257-28f577e2ee60
Burnett, M.
2c3baa00-d368-4ce7-8a8b-822ea7ebe475
Hammersley, N.
bd489944-41ab-422a-8743-794d1f031b32
Agarwal, V.
a9136686-fe91-4945-a02f-4d129e387197
Hannuna, S.
cc346a10-385f-41f9-b829-bbb56edf31ff
Burrows, A.
cd63946a-6733-439d-a071-225505c8c34c
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991

Stack, E., King, R., Janko, B., Burnett, M., Hammersley, N., Agarwal, V., Hannuna, S., Burrows, A. and Ashburn, A. (2016) Could in-home sensors surpass human observation of people with Parkinson’s at high risk of falling? An ethnographic study. BioMed Research International, 1-15. (doi:10.1155/2016/3703745).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Self-report underpins our understanding of falls among people with Parkinson’s (PwP) as they largely happen unwitnessed at home. In this qualitative study, we used an ethnographic approach to investigate which in-home sensors, placed where, could gather useful data about fall risk. Over six weeks, we observed five independently mobile PwP at high risk of falling, at home. We made field notes about falls (prior events and concerns) and recorded movement with video, Kinect and wearable sensors. The three women and two men (aged 71 to 79 years) had moderate or severe Parkinson’s, were dependent on others and highly sedentary. We most commonly noted balance protection, loss and restoration during chair transfers, walks across open spaces and through gaps, turns, steps up and down and tasks in standing (all evident walking between chair and stairs, for example). Our unobtrusive sensors were acceptable to participants: they could detect instability during everyday activity at home and potentially guide intervention. Monitoring the route between chair and stairs is likely to inform without invading the privacy of people at high risk of falling, with very limited mobility, who spend most of the day in their sitting rooms.

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Could In-home Sensors Surpass Human Observation of People with Parkinson’s at High Risk of Falling.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 11 January 2016
Published date: 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385941
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385941
ISSN: 2314-6133
PURE UUID: 80fbb694-84be-4409-9be8-280bab904a5b
ORCID for M. Burnett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5481-4398
ORCID for V. Agarwal: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6904-8243

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Feb 2016 10:06
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:53

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