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Fluid structure interaction in high performance catamaran C-foils under load

Fluid structure interaction in high performance catamaran C-foils under load
Fluid structure interaction in high performance catamaran C-foils under load
An experimental technique to accurately quantify the deformation and the bend-twist coupling of high performance composite foils under fluid loading is presented. The experimental results are reproduced in a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) environment to assess the impact of board deflection and changes in pitch angle on vertical force generated in the C-foils while sailing under increased hydrodynamic pressure.

A three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) methodology suitable for use within a wind tunnel is developed. The technique allows for the measurement of full-field deflection during fluid-structure interaction (FSI) experiments. Combined with DIC technique, the C-foil tip vortex is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to correlate the variation of the vortex position and strength to the deflection of the board. These techniques, combined with CFD investigations allow potential changes in structural behaviour to be assessed with regard to improving the performances of the foils in sailing conditions.

Experimental results are presented for a high performance curved foil from a NACRA F20 catamaran tested within the University of Southampton RJ Mitchell wind tunnel. The fluid regime is chosen to have a Reynolds number equivalent to light upwind sailing conditions (Rn=6.66x10^5: boat speed of 6 knots) with a fifth of the fluid loading experienced in the water. Curved foils provide both a hydrodynamic side-force to counteract the aerodynamic forces of the sails and a vertical lift force to reduce the wetted surface area and hence the resistance. It is therefore necessary to investigate from a sailor point of view the influences of the side force and vertical coefficients that the change in effective angle of attack and of pitch will give to the stability and the performances of the catamaran.
Marimon Giovannetti, Laura
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Banks, Joseph
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Boyd, Stephen
bcbdefe0-5acf-4d6a-8a16-f4abf7c78b10
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Marimon Giovannetti, Laura
9fada37b-24b2-4235-aa91-e8c25837953d
Banks, Joseph
3e915107-6d17-4097-8e77-99c40c8c053d
Boyd, Stephen
bcbdefe0-5acf-4d6a-8a16-f4abf7c78b10
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce

Marimon Giovannetti, Laura, Banks, Joseph, Boyd, Stephen and Turnock, Stephen (2015) Fluid structure interaction in high performance catamaran C-foils under load. Proceedings of the 5th High Performance Yacht Design Conference (HPYD 5), Auckland, New Zealand. 08 - 11 Mar 2015. 9 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

An experimental technique to accurately quantify the deformation and the bend-twist coupling of high performance composite foils under fluid loading is presented. The experimental results are reproduced in a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) environment to assess the impact of board deflection and changes in pitch angle on vertical force generated in the C-foils while sailing under increased hydrodynamic pressure.

A three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) methodology suitable for use within a wind tunnel is developed. The technique allows for the measurement of full-field deflection during fluid-structure interaction (FSI) experiments. Combined with DIC technique, the C-foil tip vortex is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to correlate the variation of the vortex position and strength to the deflection of the board. These techniques, combined with CFD investigations allow potential changes in structural behaviour to be assessed with regard to improving the performances of the foils in sailing conditions.

Experimental results are presented for a high performance curved foil from a NACRA F20 catamaran tested within the University of Southampton RJ Mitchell wind tunnel. The fluid regime is chosen to have a Reynolds number equivalent to light upwind sailing conditions (Rn=6.66x10^5: boat speed of 6 knots) with a fifth of the fluid loading experienced in the water. Curved foils provide both a hydrodynamic side-force to counteract the aerodynamic forces of the sails and a vertical lift force to reduce the wetted surface area and hence the resistance. It is therefore necessary to investigate from a sailor point of view the influences of the side force and vertical coefficients that the change in effective angle of attack and of pitch will give to the stability and the performances of the catamaran.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 March 2015
Published date: December 2015
Venue - Dates: Proceedings of the 5th High Performance Yacht Design Conference (HPYD 5), Auckland, New Zealand, 2015-03-08 - 2015-03-11
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385955
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385955
PURE UUID: 27b3933b-9932-48b3-b11d-ea5b4b82bc93
ORCID for Joseph Banks: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3777-8962
ORCID for Stephen Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400

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Date deposited: 26 Jan 2016 16:35
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 01:54

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