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MAIT cells in autoimmunity, immune mediated diseases and airways disease

MAIT cells in autoimmunity, immune mediated diseases and airways disease
MAIT cells in autoimmunity, immune mediated diseases and airways disease
Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a novel class of innate-like T cells, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor and able to recognize small molecules presented on the non-polymorphic MHC-related protein 1. Their intrinsic effector-memory phenotype, enabling secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and their relative abundance in humans implies a significant potential to contribute to autoimmune processes. However, as MAIT cells were unknown until recently and specific immunological tools were unavailable, to date little is known of their roles in disease. Here I review observations from clinical studies and animal models of autoimmune and immune mediated diseases including the roles of MAIT cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and airways diseases. MAIT cell deficiencies are frequently observed in peripheral blood, and at sites of disease such as the airways in asthma. However MAIT cells have a specific sensitivity to suppression by therapeutic corticosteroids that may confound many of these observations, as may the tendency of the surface marker CD161 to activation-induced down-regulation. Nonetheless the dependence on bacteria for the development of MAIT cells suggests a potentially important protective role linking the influences of early life microbial exposures and subsequent development of autoimmunity. Conversely MAIT cells could contribute to chronic inflammation either through TCR-independent activation, or potentially by TCR recognition of as-yet undiscovered ligands. Future research will be greatly facilitated by the immunological tools now available, including murine genetic models and human and murine specific tetramers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
autoimmunity, t cells, nflammation, lung, mucosa
0019-2805
1-33
Hinks, Timothy S.C.
14664ded-022f-47af-9d65-f49724a36e2f
Hinks, Timothy S.C.
14664ded-022f-47af-9d65-f49724a36e2f

Hinks, Timothy S.C. (2016) MAIT cells in autoimmunity, immune mediated diseases and airways disease. Immunology, 1-33. (doi:10.1111/imm.12582). (PMID:26778581)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a novel class of innate-like T cells, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor and able to recognize small molecules presented on the non-polymorphic MHC-related protein 1. Their intrinsic effector-memory phenotype, enabling secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and their relative abundance in humans implies a significant potential to contribute to autoimmune processes. However, as MAIT cells were unknown until recently and specific immunological tools were unavailable, to date little is known of their roles in disease. Here I review observations from clinical studies and animal models of autoimmune and immune mediated diseases including the roles of MAIT cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and airways diseases. MAIT cell deficiencies are frequently observed in peripheral blood, and at sites of disease such as the airways in asthma. However MAIT cells have a specific sensitivity to suppression by therapeutic corticosteroids that may confound many of these observations, as may the tendency of the surface marker CD161 to activation-induced down-regulation. Nonetheless the dependence on bacteria for the development of MAIT cells suggests a potentially important protective role linking the influences of early life microbial exposures and subsequent development of autoimmunity. Conversely MAIT cells could contribute to chronic inflammation either through TCR-independent activation, or potentially by TCR recognition of as-yet undiscovered ligands. Future research will be greatly facilitated by the immunological tools now available, including murine genetic models and human and murine specific tetramers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Accepted/In Press date: 5 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 January 2016
Keywords: autoimmunity, t cells, nflammation, lung, mucosa
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386240
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386240
ISSN: 0019-2805
PURE UUID: 822ee7cf-0058-40a7-87ed-27b8641defde

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Date deposited: 29 Jan 2016 10:23
Last modified: 09 Dec 2019 19:46

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