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The optical fibre Internet: Where next?

The optical fibre Internet: Where next?
The optical fibre Internet: Where next?
Powering the optical fibre internet with its huge global reach, photonics has changed our lives. Optical fibres snake across continents and oceans carrying terabits per second of data in a vast information network that brings untold human connectivity. But capacity demand continues to grow at a startling rate, doubling every two years, while the internet is estimated as burning several percent of world energy usage. The optical internet is reaching its capacity limits. The solution to these consequences of unbridled demand is more photonics, reaching further into the network with optics to overcome the existing bottlenecks and employing next-generation optical components - Internet 2.0.
The great success of optical fibres and planar circuits in telecommunications has generated numerous tantalising applications in a number of related fields, such as sensing, bio- and nano-photonics and high-power lasers. Incredibly, the same fibres that carry tiny internet signals can also generate kilowatts of power, sufficient to cut through inch-thick steel and perhaps drive the next generation of high energy physics.
The talk will celebrate optical fibre technology and asks what next?
Payne, D.N.
4f592b24-707f-456e-b2c6-8a6f750e296d
Payne, D.N.
4f592b24-707f-456e-b2c6-8a6f750e296d

Payne, D.N. (2012) The optical fibre Internet: Where next? 14th International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks (ICTON), United Kingdom. 02 - 05 Jul 2012. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Powering the optical fibre internet with its huge global reach, photonics has changed our lives. Optical fibres snake across continents and oceans carrying terabits per second of data in a vast information network that brings untold human connectivity. But capacity demand continues to grow at a startling rate, doubling every two years, while the internet is estimated as burning several percent of world energy usage. The optical internet is reaching its capacity limits. The solution to these consequences of unbridled demand is more photonics, reaching further into the network with optics to overcome the existing bottlenecks and employing next-generation optical components - Internet 2.0.
The great success of optical fibres and planar circuits in telecommunications has generated numerous tantalising applications in a number of related fields, such as sensing, bio- and nano-photonics and high-power lasers. Incredibly, the same fibres that carry tiny internet signals can also generate kilowatts of power, sufficient to cut through inch-thick steel and perhaps drive the next generation of high energy physics.
The talk will celebrate optical fibre technology and asks what next?

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Published date: July 2012
Venue - Dates: 14th International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks (ICTON), United Kingdom, 2012-07-02 - 2012-07-05
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

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Local EPrints ID: 386251
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386251
PURE UUID: 986b800c-d43c-4b0c-bb6e-519ec5795c57

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Date deposited: 22 Jan 2016 16:06
Last modified: 12 Aug 2019 16:31

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Contributors

Author: D.N. Payne

University divisions

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