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Organized crime in three regions: comparing the Veneto, Liverpool, and Chicago

Organized crime in three regions: comparing the Veneto, Liverpool, and Chicago
Organized crime in three regions: comparing the Veneto, Liverpool, and Chicago
This paper studies organized crime in three regions, the Veneto in Northern Italy, Liverpool in England, and Chicago in the United States. Data were gathered from published reports, government documents, and field observation. Case studies were then compiled describing organized crime in each area. The findings suggest that various jurisdictions define organized crime differently. These different definitions correspond to the nature of organized crime in each locality. In spite of these differences, however, there is consensus about the use of the term mafia. Groups that are defined as mafias generally exercise some degree of political influence in their areas of operation. Additionally, criminal groups that began as adolescent gangs retain the gang classification even after they move into drug trafficking and other organized criminal activities. These findings suggest important distinctions between organized criminal groups and improve our understanding of the term organized crime.
mafia, organized crime, chicago outfit, the veneto, chicago, liverpool, camorra, 'ndrangheta, crime firms
1084-4791
265-285
Lavorgna, Anita
6e34317e-2dda-42b9-8244-14747695598c
Lombardo, Robert
a04ce601-d456-4f71-97b0-32e257ab8cbb
Sergi, Anna
fb5bfa68-0afc-4518-af08-6a165963731a
Lavorgna, Anita
6e34317e-2dda-42b9-8244-14747695598c
Lombardo, Robert
a04ce601-d456-4f71-97b0-32e257ab8cbb
Sergi, Anna
fb5bfa68-0afc-4518-af08-6a165963731a

Lavorgna, Anita, Lombardo, Robert and Sergi, Anna (2013) Organized crime in three regions: comparing the Veneto, Liverpool, and Chicago. Trends in Organized Crime, 16 (3), 265-285. (doi:10.1007/s12117-013-9189-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper studies organized crime in three regions, the Veneto in Northern Italy, Liverpool in England, and Chicago in the United States. Data were gathered from published reports, government documents, and field observation. Case studies were then compiled describing organized crime in each area. The findings suggest that various jurisdictions define organized crime differently. These different definitions correspond to the nature of organized crime in each locality. In spite of these differences, however, there is consensus about the use of the term mafia. Groups that are defined as mafias generally exercise some degree of political influence in their areas of operation. Additionally, criminal groups that began as adolescent gangs retain the gang classification even after they move into drug trafficking and other organized criminal activities. These findings suggest important distinctions between organized criminal groups and improve our understanding of the term organized crime.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 9 February 2013
Published date: September 2013
Keywords: mafia, organized crime, chicago outfit, the veneto, chicago, liverpool, camorra, 'ndrangheta, crime firms
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386255
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386255
ISSN: 1084-4791
PURE UUID: a33e5709-72cc-47e9-912b-fdca03be8ca4
ORCID for Anita Lavorgna: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8484-1613

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jan 2016 11:33
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:33

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Contributors

Author: Anita Lavorgna ORCID iD
Author: Robert Lombardo
Author: Anna Sergi

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