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Review: Overcoming the paradox of strength and ductility in ultra-fine grained materials at low temperatures

Review: Overcoming the paradox of strength and ductility in ultra-fine grained materials at low temperatures
Review: Overcoming the paradox of strength and ductility in ultra-fine grained materials at low temperatures
Ultrafine-grained (UFG) materials with grain sizes in the submicrometer or nanometer range may be prepared through the application of severe plastic deformation (SPD) to bulk coarse-grained solids. These materials generally exhibit high strength but only very limited ductility in low-temperature testing, thereby giving rise to the so-called paradox of strength and ductility. This paradox is examined and a new quantitative diagram is presented which permits the easy insertion of experimental data. It is shown that relatively simple procedures are available for achieving both high strength and high ductility in UFG materials including processing the material to a very high strain and/or applying a very short-term anneal immediately after the SPD processing. Significant evidence is now available demonstrating the occurrence of grain boundary sliding in these materials at low temperatures, where this is attributed to the presence of non-equilibrium grain boundaries and the occurrence of enhanced diffusion along these boundaries.ures.
review, overcoming, paradox, strength, duplicity, ultra, fine, grained, materials, low, temperatures
0022-2461
7-18
Kumar, P.
f57e4ef2-18e6-4f90-be71-7450c42df258
Kawasaki, M.
d0ce18b9-8403-4db2-9cb2-3a6165f288a6
Langdon, T.G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Kumar, P.
f57e4ef2-18e6-4f90-be71-7450c42df258
Kawasaki, M.
d0ce18b9-8403-4db2-9cb2-3a6165f288a6
Langdon, T.G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Kumar, P., Kawasaki, M. and Langdon, T.G. (2016) Review: Overcoming the paradox of strength and ductility in ultra-fine grained materials at low temperatures. [in special issue: 50th Anniversary] Journal of Materials Science, 51 (1), 7-18. (doi:10.1007/s10853-015-9143-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ultrafine-grained (UFG) materials with grain sizes in the submicrometer or nanometer range may be prepared through the application of severe plastic deformation (SPD) to bulk coarse-grained solids. These materials generally exhibit high strength but only very limited ductility in low-temperature testing, thereby giving rise to the so-called paradox of strength and ductility. This paradox is examined and a new quantitative diagram is presented which permits the easy insertion of experimental data. It is shown that relatively simple procedures are available for achieving both high strength and high ductility in UFG materials including processing the material to a very high strain and/or applying a very short-term anneal immediately after the SPD processing. Significant evidence is now available demonstrating the occurrence of grain boundary sliding in these materials at low temperatures, where this is attributed to the presence of non-equilibrium grain boundaries and the occurrence of enhanced diffusion along these boundaries.ures.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 May 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 June 2015
Published date: January 2016
Keywords: review, overcoming, paradox, strength, duplicity, ultra, fine, grained, materials, low, temperatures
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp, Engineering Science Unit, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386303
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386303
ISSN: 0022-2461
PURE UUID: f8d9cf71-26dd-4edd-8eb7-e8315efac753
ORCID for T.G. Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jan 2016 16:29
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:50

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