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Description of the superplastic flow process by deformation mechanism maps in ultrafine-grained materials

Description of the superplastic flow process by deformation mechanism maps in ultrafine-grained materials
Description of the superplastic flow process by deformation mechanism maps in ultrafine-grained materials
The synthesis of ultrafine-grained (UFG) materials is very attractive because small grains lead to excellent creep properties including superplastic ductility at elevated temperatures. Severe plastic deformation (SPD) is an attractive processing technique for refining microstructures of metallic materials to have ultrafine grain sizes within the submicrometer to even the nanometer level. Among the SPD techniques, most effective processing is conducted through equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT) and there are numerous reports demonstrating the improved tensile properties at elevated temperature. This report demonstrates recent results on superplasticity in metals after ECAP and HPT. Moreover, superplastic flow of the UFG materials is evaluated by using flow mechanisms developed earlier for coarse-grained materials and depicted by plotting deformation mechanism maps which provide excellent visual representations of flow properties over a wide range of testing conditions.
superplastic, flow, process, deformation, mechanism, maps, ultrafine-grained, materials
1662-9752
51-58
Kawasaki, Megumi
944ba471-eb78-46db-bfb7-3f0296d9ef6d
Langdon, Terence G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Kawasaki, Megumi
944ba471-eb78-46db-bfb7-3f0296d9ef6d
Langdon, Terence G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Kawasaki, Megumi and Langdon, Terence G. (2016) Description of the superplastic flow process by deformation mechanism maps in ultrafine-grained materials. Materials Science Forum, 838-839, 51-58. (doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.838-839.51).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The synthesis of ultrafine-grained (UFG) materials is very attractive because small grains lead to excellent creep properties including superplastic ductility at elevated temperatures. Severe plastic deformation (SPD) is an attractive processing technique for refining microstructures of metallic materials to have ultrafine grain sizes within the submicrometer to even the nanometer level. Among the SPD techniques, most effective processing is conducted through equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT) and there are numerous reports demonstrating the improved tensile properties at elevated temperature. This report demonstrates recent results on superplasticity in metals after ECAP and HPT. Moreover, superplastic flow of the UFG materials is evaluated by using flow mechanisms developed earlier for coarse-grained materials and depicted by plotting deformation mechanism maps which provide excellent visual representations of flow properties over a wide range of testing conditions.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 July 2015
Published date: 8 January 2016
Keywords: superplastic, flow, process, deformation, mechanism, maps, ultrafine-grained, materials
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp, Engineering Science Unit, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386306
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386306
ISSN: 1662-9752
PURE UUID: 6bc7c9b0-201c-451b-b723-9555bc12289a
ORCID for Terence G. Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Feb 2016 10:28
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:03

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