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More than just food: field visits to an emergency relief centre

More than just food: field visits to an emergency relief centre
More than just food: field visits to an emergency relief centre
Emergency relief centres provide financial, housing, food and other types of support to families and individuals who experience financial hardship. These centres are non-profit, often government supported organizations that rely on the help of their volunteers and social workers. This paper reports on our preliminary findings from field visits to one such centre called Communify, in the inner west of Brisbane, Australia. Communify runs an emergency food relief facility for people who find themselves in a crisis or temporarily unable to afford groceries. Over a period of five months, we did several field visits to the centre and carried out 21 short in-situ interviews, with a mix of Communify clients and volunteers. Our results shed light on people's experiences of financial hardship and their interactions with the emergency relief centre. In particular, issues related to their perceived values and stigmas associated with their experiences are highlighted in our findings. We identify opportunities for design that can empower people struggling with financial hardship.
emergency relief, design, HCI, financial hardship
978-1-4503-3673-4
662-666
ACM
Vyas, Dhaval
74485b22-71c5-4e29-976b-3816646150d5
Snow, Stephen
1ba928e0-a4d7-4392-ae59-31ac8467eb94
Mallet, Miranda
13948e30-b4db-47c9-b048-35fe6aa13896
Ploderer, Bernd
Vyas, Dhaval
74485b22-71c5-4e29-976b-3816646150d5
Snow, Stephen
1ba928e0-a4d7-4392-ae59-31ac8467eb94
Mallet, Miranda
13948e30-b4db-47c9-b048-35fe6aa13896
Ploderer, Bernd

Vyas, Dhaval, Snow, Stephen and Mallet, Miranda (2015) More than just food: field visits to an emergency relief centre. Ploderer, Bernd (ed.) In OzCHI '15 Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Australian Special Interest Group for Computer Human Interaction. ACM. pp. 662-666 . (doi:10.1145/2838739.2838787).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Emergency relief centres provide financial, housing, food and other types of support to families and individuals who experience financial hardship. These centres are non-profit, often government supported organizations that rely on the help of their volunteers and social workers. This paper reports on our preliminary findings from field visits to one such centre called Communify, in the inner west of Brisbane, Australia. Communify runs an emergency food relief facility for people who find themselves in a crisis or temporarily unable to afford groceries. Over a period of five months, we did several field visits to the centre and carried out 21 short in-situ interviews, with a mix of Communify clients and volunteers. Our results shed light on people's experiences of financial hardship and their interactions with the emergency relief centre. In particular, issues related to their perceived values and stigmas associated with their experiences are highlighted in our findings. We identify opportunities for design that can empower people struggling with financial hardship.

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More information

Published date: December 2015
Venue - Dates: other; 2015-12-01, 2015-12-01
Keywords: emergency relief, design, HCI, financial hardship
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386429
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386429
ISBN: 978-1-4503-3673-4
PURE UUID: 8efc982a-71a8-4b31-b853-ff6affb22d2d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2016 11:31
Last modified: 14 Apr 2020 16:32

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