The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

UK investments in global infectious disease research 1997–2010: a case study

UK investments in global infectious disease research 1997–2010: a case study
UK investments in global infectious disease research 1997–2010: a case study
Background: Infectious diseases account for 15 million deaths per year worldwide, and disproportionately affect young people, elderly people, and the poorest sections of society. We aimed to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for infectious disease research.

Methods: We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from funding institutions and created a comprehensive database of infectious disease research projects for the period 1997–2010. We categorised studies and funding by disease, cross-cutting theme, and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. Regression analyses were reported with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to establish the relation between research investment, mortality, and disease burden as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).

Findings: We identified 6170 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK£2·6 billion. Studies with a clear global health component represented 35·6% of all funding (£927 million). By disease, HIV received £461 million (17·7%), malaria £346 million (13·3%), tuberculosis £149 million (5·7%), influenza £80 million (3·1%), and hepatitis C £60 million (2·3%). We compared funding with disease burden (DALYs and mortality) to show low levels of investment relative to burden for gastrointestinal infections (£254 million, 9·7%), some neglected tropical diseases (£184 million, 7·1%), and antimicrobial resistance (£96 million, 3·7%). Virology was the highest funded category (£1 billion, 38·4%). Leading funding sources were the Wellcome Trust (£688 million, 26·4%) and the Medical Research Council (£673 million, 25·8%).

Interpretation: Research funding has to be aligned with prevailing and projected global infectious disease burden. Funding agencies and industry need to openly document their research investments to redress any inequities in resource allocation.
1473-3099
55-64
Head, Michael
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Fitchett, Joseph R.
1eae456d-373c-428b-a276-353f0a75822e
Cooke, Mary K.
6e457199-aad2-4b44-b8c3-f042babcbe05
Wurie, Fatima B.
96223c39-3a27-4a0f-9b4f-328ab85c98e8
Hayward, Andrew C.
443e4eeb-1e49-4489-bdd6-72bacf188a92
Atun, Rifat
20f14d3b-facf-4079-8566-eb6d13521a34
Head, Michael
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Fitchett, Joseph R.
1eae456d-373c-428b-a276-353f0a75822e
Cooke, Mary K.
6e457199-aad2-4b44-b8c3-f042babcbe05
Wurie, Fatima B.
96223c39-3a27-4a0f-9b4f-328ab85c98e8
Hayward, Andrew C.
443e4eeb-1e49-4489-bdd6-72bacf188a92
Atun, Rifat
20f14d3b-facf-4079-8566-eb6d13521a34

Head, Michael, Fitchett, Joseph R., Cooke, Mary K., Wurie, Fatima B., Hayward, Andrew C. and Atun, Rifat (2013) UK investments in global infectious disease research 1997–2010: a case study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 13 (1), 55-64. (doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(12)70261-X).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Infectious diseases account for 15 million deaths per year worldwide, and disproportionately affect young people, elderly people, and the poorest sections of society. We aimed to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for infectious disease research.

Methods: We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from funding institutions and created a comprehensive database of infectious disease research projects for the period 1997–2010. We categorised studies and funding by disease, cross-cutting theme, and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. Regression analyses were reported with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to establish the relation between research investment, mortality, and disease burden as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).

Findings: We identified 6170 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK£2·6 billion. Studies with a clear global health component represented 35·6% of all funding (£927 million). By disease, HIV received £461 million (17·7%), malaria £346 million (13·3%), tuberculosis £149 million (5·7%), influenza £80 million (3·1%), and hepatitis C £60 million (2·3%). We compared funding with disease burden (DALYs and mortality) to show low levels of investment relative to burden for gastrointestinal infections (£254 million, 9·7%), some neglected tropical diseases (£184 million, 7·1%), and antimicrobial resistance (£96 million, 3·7%). Virology was the highest funded category (£1 billion, 38·4%). Leading funding sources were the Wellcome Trust (£688 million, 26·4%) and the Medical Research Council (£673 million, 25·8%).

Interpretation: Research funding has to be aligned with prevailing and projected global infectious disease burden. Funding agencies and industry need to openly document their research investments to redress any inequities in resource allocation.

Text
published Lancet ID paper.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (326kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 November 2012
Published date: January 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, CES General

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386495
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386495
ISSN: 1473-3099
PURE UUID: 490e9c52-6d2a-4b7d-a76e-5412eaacdcaa
ORCID for Michael Head: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1189-0531

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Feb 2016 16:09
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×