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Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010

Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010
Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010
Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting.
hepatitis a, hepatitis b, hepititis c, funding, research
1352-0504
230-237
Head, M.G.
6647faf6-ad6b-45a4-951c-3b182630adff
Fitchett, J.R.
f8f56bf8-924d-40c0-b0b8-772c885a6c7a
Cooke, G.S.
3f8fc4b7-d143-47e4-832b-0cfb9b1058f1
Foster, G.R.
fef142a2-2637-41f4-a5bf-6ecbc625d88b
Atun, R.
feb620b0-a662-4642-ba73-2ca4b7dae81a
Head, M.G.
6647faf6-ad6b-45a4-951c-3b182630adff
Fitchett, J.R.
f8f56bf8-924d-40c0-b0b8-772c885a6c7a
Cooke, G.S.
3f8fc4b7-d143-47e4-832b-0cfb9b1058f1
Foster, G.R.
fef142a2-2637-41f4-a5bf-6ecbc625d88b
Atun, R.
feb620b0-a662-4642-ba73-2ca4b7dae81a

Head, M.G., Fitchett, J.R., Cooke, G.S., Foster, G.R. and Atun, R. (2015) Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010. Journal of Viral Hepatitis, 22 (3), 230-237. (doi:10.1111/jvh.12300).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 July 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 August 2014
Published date: March 2015
Keywords: hepatitis a, hepatitis b, hepititis c, funding, research
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386504
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386504
ISSN: 1352-0504
PURE UUID: 8990808d-c4b3-462a-a3a7-43975e2c75f2

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Date deposited: 01 Feb 2016 16:51
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:49

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