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Investing in emerging infectious diseases: a systematic analysis of UK research

Investing in emerging infectious diseases: a systematic analysis of UK research
Investing in emerging infectious diseases: a systematic analysis of UK research
Background: Emerging and infectious diseases threaten health, security, and the global economy. However, little is known about investments in research to tackle outbreaks and innovate new tools for infectious disease control.

Methods & Materials: We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research investments for the period 1997-2010. We identified 325,922 studies for screening, included 6,165 studies in the initial analysis, and identified 654 studies on emerging infectious diseases in the final analysis.

Results: We identified a total research investment in emerging infectious diseases of £199 million, accounting for 7.7% of a total research investment in infectious diseases of £2.6 billion. In comparison, investment in HIV research amounted to £478 million (18.4% of total investment).

Diagnostic tools for control accounted for £9.8 million (4.9%) across 66 studies. Studies assessing therapeutics accounted for £20.0 million (9.9%) across 35 studies. Vaccine research attracted the least funding for tools to tackle emerging infectious diseases, with £11.5 million (5.8%) across 24 studies.

Hepatitis C received the most investment with £59.7 million (30.0%), followed by prion research with £33.5 million (16.8%), Campylobacter jejuni with £24.1 million (12.1%), and Helicobacter pylori with £15.1 million (7.6%). Although total influenza investment was £80.1 million, funding specifically for H5N1 influenza virus was £13.7 million (6.9%) and for H1N1 influenza virus was £10.8 million (5.4%).

Public funding accounted for £144.0 million (72.3%) across 361 studies with philanthropic funding awarding £40.6 million (20.4%) across 173. Preclinical research attracted the most investment with £142.4 million (71.5%) followed by epidemiological and operational research with £42.1 million (21.2%) and product development research with £12.2 million (6.1%). Phase 1, 2, 3 clinical trials was the least well-funded type of research with £2.5 million (1.2%).

Conclusion: Emerging infectious diseases receives small amounts of funding compared to other scientific disciplines, with the exception of HIV. It is essential that we map, monitor and evaluate emerging infectious disease research funding given their importance to global health security.
1201-9712
232
Fitchett, J.R.
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Head, M.
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Heymann, D.
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Atun, R.
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Fitchett, J.R.
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Head, M.
41341a91-9c70-43b5-8c7f-09a79ff2cb2b
Heymann, D.
4c58ca5a-5a32-4ed3-80b4-ea4ad2827e3f
Atun, R.
feb620b0-a662-4642-ba73-2ca4b7dae81a

Fitchett, J.R., Head, M., Heymann, D. and Atun, R. (2014) Investing in emerging infectious diseases: a systematic analysis of UK research. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 21, supplement 1, 232. (doi:10.1016/j.ijid.2014.03.904).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Emerging and infectious diseases threaten health, security, and the global economy. However, little is known about investments in research to tackle outbreaks and innovate new tools for infectious disease control.

Methods & Materials: We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research investments for the period 1997-2010. We identified 325,922 studies for screening, included 6,165 studies in the initial analysis, and identified 654 studies on emerging infectious diseases in the final analysis.

Results: We identified a total research investment in emerging infectious diseases of £199 million, accounting for 7.7% of a total research investment in infectious diseases of £2.6 billion. In comparison, investment in HIV research amounted to £478 million (18.4% of total investment).

Diagnostic tools for control accounted for £9.8 million (4.9%) across 66 studies. Studies assessing therapeutics accounted for £20.0 million (9.9%) across 35 studies. Vaccine research attracted the least funding for tools to tackle emerging infectious diseases, with £11.5 million (5.8%) across 24 studies.

Hepatitis C received the most investment with £59.7 million (30.0%), followed by prion research with £33.5 million (16.8%), Campylobacter jejuni with £24.1 million (12.1%), and Helicobacter pylori with £15.1 million (7.6%). Although total influenza investment was £80.1 million, funding specifically for H5N1 influenza virus was £13.7 million (6.9%) and for H1N1 influenza virus was £10.8 million (5.4%).

Public funding accounted for £144.0 million (72.3%) across 361 studies with philanthropic funding awarding £40.6 million (20.4%) across 173. Preclinical research attracted the most investment with £142.4 million (71.5%) followed by epidemiological and operational research with £42.1 million (21.2%) and product development research with £12.2 million (6.1%). Phase 1, 2, 3 clinical trials was the least well-funded type of research with £2.5 million (1.2%).

Conclusion: Emerging infectious diseases receives small amounts of funding compared to other scientific disciplines, with the exception of HIV. It is essential that we map, monitor and evaluate emerging infectious disease research funding given their importance to global health security.

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Published date: April 2014
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 386506
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386506
ISSN: 1201-9712
PURE UUID: e2249daf-c8f6-4bb5-9d6f-3f055ec56de6

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Date deposited: 02 Feb 2016 09:00
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:49

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Author: J.R. Fitchett
Author: M. Head
Author: D. Heymann
Author: R. Atun

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