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The subjective effect of low frequency content in road traffic noise

The subjective effect of low frequency content in road traffic noise
The subjective effect of low frequency content in road traffic noise
Based on subjective listening trials, Torija and Flindell [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 1–4 (2014)] observed that low frequency content in typical urban main road traffic noise appeared to make a smaller contribution to reported annoyance than might be inferred from its objective or physical dominance. This paper reports a more detailed study which was aimed at (i) identifying the difference in sound levels at which low frequency content becomes subjectively dominant over mid and high frequency content and (ii) investigating the relationship between loudness and annoyance under conditions where low frequency content is relatively more dominant, such as indoors where mid and high frequency content is reduced. The results suggested that differences of at least +30?dB between the low frequency and the mid/high frequency content are needed for changes in low frequency content to have as much subjective effect as equivalent changes in mid and high frequency content. This suggests that common criticisms of the A-frequency weighting based on a hypothesized excessive downweighting of the low frequency content may be relatively unfounded in this application area.
0001-4966
189-198
Torija, Antonio J.
6dd0d982-fcd6-42b6-9148-211175fd3287
Flindell, Ian H.
92801193-de59-4b33-af0a-e1a13a77a055
Torija, Antonio J.
6dd0d982-fcd6-42b6-9148-211175fd3287
Flindell, Ian H.
92801193-de59-4b33-af0a-e1a13a77a055

Torija, Antonio J. and Flindell, Ian H. (2015) The subjective effect of low frequency content in road traffic noise. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137 (1), 189-198. (doi:10.1121/1.4904542).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Based on subjective listening trials, Torija and Flindell [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 1–4 (2014)] observed that low frequency content in typical urban main road traffic noise appeared to make a smaller contribution to reported annoyance than might be inferred from its objective or physical dominance. This paper reports a more detailed study which was aimed at (i) identifying the difference in sound levels at which low frequency content becomes subjectively dominant over mid and high frequency content and (ii) investigating the relationship between loudness and annoyance under conditions where low frequency content is relatively more dominant, such as indoors where mid and high frequency content is reduced. The results suggested that differences of at least +30?dB between the low frequency and the mid/high frequency content are needed for changes in low frequency content to have as much subjective effect as equivalent changes in mid and high frequency content. This suggests that common criticisms of the A-frequency weighting based on a hypothesized excessive downweighting of the low frequency content may be relatively unfounded in this application area.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 November 2014
Published date: January 2015
Organisations: Acoustics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386682
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386682
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 18796503-3d31-490b-918d-28272a2877c7
ORCID for Antonio J. Torija: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5915-3736

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Feb 2016 11:49
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:34

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Contributors

Author: Ian H. Flindell

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