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The importance of atmospheric deposition for ocean productivity

The importance of atmospheric deposition for ocean productivity
The importance of atmospheric deposition for ocean productivity
Dust is produced primarily in desert regions and transported long distances through the atmosphere to the oceans. Upon deposition of dust, its dissolution can provide an important source of a range of nutrients, particularly iron, to microbes living in open ocean surface waters. The dust supply is greatest nearest to deserts, hence in the Northern Hemisphere. The Southern Ocean region is farthest from these dust sources and shows clear evidence that phytoplankton primary production is limited, at least in part, by the rate of supply of iron. Iron is also essential for nitrogen fixation. In regions of high atmospheric iron supply, such as the tropical North Atlantic, stimulation of nitrogen fixation drives the phytoplankton population toward a state in which phosphorus supply rates limit primary production. Atmospheric deposition is also an important source of nitrogen to the low latitude ocean, where it stimulates primary production. In this review we consider the sources, transport, and deposition of atmospheric dust/iron and nitrogen to the oceans and their impacts on plankton systems. In conclusion, we suggest key areas for future research.
1543-592X
481-501
Jickells, Tim
094e5c61-cf45-464f-91e6-9727c9dcb0c0
Moore, C. Mark
7ec80b7b-bedc-4dd5-8924-0f5d01927b12
Jickells, Tim
094e5c61-cf45-464f-91e6-9727c9dcb0c0
Moore, C. Mark
7ec80b7b-bedc-4dd5-8924-0f5d01927b12

Jickells, Tim and Moore, C. Mark (2015) The importance of atmospheric deposition for ocean productivity. Annual Review of Ecology Evolution and Systematics, 46 (1), 481-501. (doi:10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054118).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dust is produced primarily in desert regions and transported long distances through the atmosphere to the oceans. Upon deposition of dust, its dissolution can provide an important source of a range of nutrients, particularly iron, to microbes living in open ocean surface waters. The dust supply is greatest nearest to deserts, hence in the Northern Hemisphere. The Southern Ocean region is farthest from these dust sources and shows clear evidence that phytoplankton primary production is limited, at least in part, by the rate of supply of iron. Iron is also essential for nitrogen fixation. In regions of high atmospheric iron supply, such as the tropical North Atlantic, stimulation of nitrogen fixation drives the phytoplankton population toward a state in which phosphorus supply rates limit primary production. Atmospheric deposition is also an important source of nitrogen to the low latitude ocean, where it stimulates primary production. In this review we consider the sources, transport, and deposition of atmospheric dust/iron and nitrogen to the oceans and their impacts on plankton systems. In conclusion, we suggest key areas for future research.

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Published date: December 2015
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 386911
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386911
ISSN: 1543-592X
PURE UUID: 8ce4c01e-e284-4894-90f0-c5a53aa78c4e
ORCID for C. Mark Moore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9541-6046

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Date deposited: 04 Feb 2016 11:40
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Tim Jickells
Author: C. Mark Moore ORCID iD

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