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Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia

Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia
Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia
We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age?matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low? (0.02–0.07 Hz), low? (0.07–0.20 Hz), and high?frequency (0.20–0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ? 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ? 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R2 = 0.20–0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ? 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA.
Allan, Philip D.
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Faulkner, James
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O'Donnell, Terrence
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Lanford, Jeremy
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Wong, Lai‐kin
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Saleem, Saqib
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Woolley, Brandon
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Lambrick, Danielle
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Stoner, Lee
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Tzeng, Yu‐Chieh
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Allan, Philip D.
fbbf707d-7c24-41fe-acd8-923f19cf7379
Faulkner, James
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O'Donnell, Terrence
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Lanford, Jeremy
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Wong, Lai‐kin
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Saleem, Saqib
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Woolley, Brandon
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Lambrick, Danielle
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Stoner, Lee
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Tzeng, Yu‐Chieh
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Allan, Philip D., Faulkner, James, O'Donnell, Terrence, Lanford, Jeremy, Wong, Lai‐kin, Saleem, Saqib, Woolley, Brandon, Lambrick, Danielle, Stoner, Lee and Tzeng, Yu‐Chieh (2015) Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia. Physiological Reports, 3 (11), [e12602]. (doi:10.14814/phy2.12602).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age?matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low? (0.02–0.07 Hz), low? (0.07–0.20 Hz), and high?frequency (0.20–0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ? 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ? 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R2 = 0.20–0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ? 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA.

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 October 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 November 2015
Published date: November 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386935
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386935
PURE UUID: c32110a4-5452-4544-910c-8c817c829e12
ORCID for Danielle Lambrick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0325-6015

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Date deposited: 05 Feb 2016 14:44
Last modified: 24 Jul 2020 01:41

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