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Developmental influences on cardiovascular structure and function in childhood assessed using magnetic resonance imaging

Developmental influences on cardiovascular structure and function in childhood assessed using magnetic resonance imaging
Developmental influences on cardiovascular structure and function in childhood assessed using magnetic resonance imaging
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The incidence of CVD often cannot be explained by adult lifestyle factors; epidemiological research suggests a link between the early developmental environment, and the risk of CVD in later life. The aim of this research was to assess the influence of the early developmental environment on childhood cardiovascular structure and function measured at the age of 9 years. MRI measures of left ventricular cardiac volumes and mass, and aortic stiffness (aortic root distensibility and aortic pulse wave velocity), a recognised marker of cardiovascular risk, were developed and data acquired on subjects in a mother-offspring cohort. Lower maternal oily fish consumption and lower maternal vitamin D status in late pregnancy were associated with increased child’s arterial stiffness. Lower maternal educational attainment, poor self-reported maternal health, and higher levels of self-perceived maternal stress were associated with smaller child’s left ventricular volumes and mass. The findings suggest an effect of maternal nutrition on vascular development in utero and on arterial structure in the offspring. The findings also suggest that maternal health and wellbeing has an effect on cardiac structural development. The effect sizes were modest, but even small favourable changes to childhood cardiovascular structure and function may have substantial beneficial consequences for cardiovascular risk later in the life course. Lifestyle interventions to improve educational attainment and nutrition literacy in young women may reduce cardiovascular risk in the next generation.
University of Southampton
Bryant, Jennifer
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Bryant, Jennifer
f4aeabbf-5014-45ed-bab4-e041d55afb88
Godfrey, Keith
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Hanson, Mark
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Peebles, Charles
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Bryant, Jennifer (2015) Developmental influences on cardiovascular structure and function in childhood assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. University of Southampton, Faculty of Medicine, Doctoral Thesis, 212pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The incidence of CVD often cannot be explained by adult lifestyle factors; epidemiological research suggests a link between the early developmental environment, and the risk of CVD in later life. The aim of this research was to assess the influence of the early developmental environment on childhood cardiovascular structure and function measured at the age of 9 years. MRI measures of left ventricular cardiac volumes and mass, and aortic stiffness (aortic root distensibility and aortic pulse wave velocity), a recognised marker of cardiovascular risk, were developed and data acquired on subjects in a mother-offspring cohort. Lower maternal oily fish consumption and lower maternal vitamin D status in late pregnancy were associated with increased child’s arterial stiffness. Lower maternal educational attainment, poor self-reported maternal health, and higher levels of self-perceived maternal stress were associated with smaller child’s left ventricular volumes and mass. The findings suggest an effect of maternal nutrition on vascular development in utero and on arterial structure in the offspring. The findings also suggest that maternal health and wellbeing has an effect on cardiac structural development. The effect sizes were modest, but even small favourable changes to childhood cardiovascular structure and function may have substantial beneficial consequences for cardiovascular risk later in the life course. Lifestyle interventions to improve educational attainment and nutrition literacy in young women may reduce cardiovascular risk in the next generation.

Text
JBryant thesis Jan 2016.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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More information

Published date: September 2015
Organisations: University of Southampton, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386943
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386943
PURE UUID: 6eeb27b4-0f3f-44dc-a91e-0063e71b26ab
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Mark Hanson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Feb 2016 13:56
Last modified: 27 Jul 2018 00:34

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