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MC3R gene polymorphisms are associated with early childhood adiposity gain and infant appetite in an Asian population

MC3R gene polymorphisms are associated with early childhood adiposity gain and infant appetite in an Asian population
MC3R gene polymorphisms are associated with early childhood adiposity gain and infant appetite in an Asian population
Background: Polymorphic variants within human melanocortin-3 receptor gene (MC3R) gene have been associated with obesity. However, its influence on infancy and early childhood adiposity has not been reported before.

Objectives:We assessed associations between genotype at polymorphic sites within MC3R with early childhood adiposity and interaction with early childhood appetitive traits.

Methods: We studied 1090 singletons in an Asian mother–offspring cohort genotyped for MC3R and in a subgroup (n?=?422) who had completed Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaires (CEBQ) at 12 months. Children were followed from birth to 48 months, and up to 10 measurements of body mass index and five measures of triceps and subscapular skin-folds were obtained.

Results: Independent of potential confounders, each additional MC3R minor allele copy was associated with greater body mass index standard deviation score [B{95% confidence interval}: 0.004?units/month {0.001,0.007}; p?=?0.007], triceps [0.009?mm/month {0.001,0.02}; p?=?0.021] and subscapular skin-fold [0.008?mm/month {0.002,0.01}; p?=?0.011] gain velocity in the first 48 months. Each additional MC3R minor allele copy was also associated with increased odds of overweight [odds ratio {95% confidence interval}: 1.48{1.17–1.88}] and obesity [1.58{1.10–2.28}] in the first 48 months. Every additional copy of MC3R minor allele was positively associated with ‘slowness-in-eating’ appetitive trait [0.24{0.06,0.39}, p?=?0.006]; however, the relationship between ‘slowness-in-eating’ with adiposity gain was not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Our findings support the role of MC3R genetic variants in adiposity gain during early childhood.
childhood adiposity, MC3R, single nucleotide polymorphism
1-9
Aris, I.M.
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Tint, M.T.
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Teh, A.L.
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Holbrook, J.D.
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Quah, P.L.
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Chong, M.F.
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Lin, X.
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Soh, S.E.
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Saw, S.M.
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Kwek, K.
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Godfrey, K.M.
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Gluckman, P.D.
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Chong, Y.S.
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Lek, N.
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Yap, F.
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Lee, Y.S.
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Aris, I.M.
ee15a46e-ead3-4b4a-a208-d39038a85480
Tint, M.T.
02d6a006-3b94-4328-b3c3-147a618d66c3
Teh, A.L.
56defbf6-fd2a-49d4-97f7-e63453abcebf
Holbrook, J.D.
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Quah, P.L.
8fae651e-c572-4d04-8708-e66af6caec7e
Chong, M.F.
817aa809-0368-4e08-a395-1e7fc2e0410f
Lin, X.
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Soh, S.E.
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Saw, S.M.
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Kwek, K.
1a9b6c6e-a5e9-40a2-9bfe-44c2cea62a98
Godfrey, K.M.
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Gluckman, P.D.
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Chong, Y.S.
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Lek, N.
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Yap, F.
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Lee, Y.S.
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Aris, I.M., Tint, M.T., Teh, A.L., Holbrook, J.D., Quah, P.L., Chong, M.F., Lin, X., Soh, S.E., Saw, S.M., Kwek, K., Godfrey, K.M., Gluckman, P.D., Chong, Y.S., Lek, N., Yap, F. and Lee, Y.S. (2015) MC3R gene polymorphisms are associated with early childhood adiposity gain and infant appetite in an Asian population. Pediatric Obesity, 1-9. (doi:10.1111/ijpo.12086). (PMID:26663875)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Polymorphic variants within human melanocortin-3 receptor gene (MC3R) gene have been associated with obesity. However, its influence on infancy and early childhood adiposity has not been reported before.

Objectives:We assessed associations between genotype at polymorphic sites within MC3R with early childhood adiposity and interaction with early childhood appetitive traits.

Methods: We studied 1090 singletons in an Asian mother–offspring cohort genotyped for MC3R and in a subgroup (n?=?422) who had completed Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaires (CEBQ) at 12 months. Children were followed from birth to 48 months, and up to 10 measurements of body mass index and five measures of triceps and subscapular skin-folds were obtained.

Results: Independent of potential confounders, each additional MC3R minor allele copy was associated with greater body mass index standard deviation score [B{95% confidence interval}: 0.004?units/month {0.001,0.007}; p?=?0.007], triceps [0.009?mm/month {0.001,0.02}; p?=?0.021] and subscapular skin-fold [0.008?mm/month {0.002,0.01}; p?=?0.011] gain velocity in the first 48 months. Each additional MC3R minor allele copy was also associated with increased odds of overweight [odds ratio {95% confidence interval}: 1.48{1.17–1.88}] and obesity [1.58{1.10–2.28}] in the first 48 months. Every additional copy of MC3R minor allele was positively associated with ‘slowness-in-eating’ appetitive trait [0.24{0.06,0.39}, p?=?0.006]; however, the relationship between ‘slowness-in-eating’ with adiposity gain was not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Our findings support the role of MC3R genetic variants in adiposity gain during early childhood.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 October 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 December 2015
Keywords: childhood adiposity, MC3R, single nucleotide polymorphism
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386978
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386978
PURE UUID: 34d06a5c-0bfa-4d09-84b4-dc12ee59addc
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 08 Feb 2016 10:16
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:11

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Contributors

Author: I.M. Aris
Author: M.T. Tint
Author: A.L. Teh
Author: J.D. Holbrook
Author: P.L. Quah
Author: M.F. Chong
Author: X. Lin
Author: S.E. Soh
Author: S.M. Saw
Author: K. Kwek
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: P.D. Gluckman
Author: Y.S. Chong
Author: N. Lek
Author: F. Yap
Author: Y.S. Lee

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