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Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010

Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010
Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010
Objectives: Fungal infections cause significant global morbidity and mortality. We have previously described the UK investments in global infectious disease research, and here our objective is to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for mycology research and outline potential funding gaps in the UK portfolio.

Design: Systematic analysis.

Setting: UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research.

Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcome is the amount of funding and number of studies related to mycology research. Secondary outcomes are describing the investments made to specific fungal pathogens and diseases, and also the type of science along the R&D value chain.

Methods: We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from public and philanthropic funding institutions awarded between 1997 and 2010, and highlighted the mycology-related projects.

Results: Of 6165 funded studies, we identified 171 studies related to mycology (total investment £48.4 million, 1.9% of all infection research, with mean annual funding £3.5 million). Studies related to global health represented 5.1% of this funding (£2.4 million, compared with 35.6% of all infectious diseases). Leading funders were the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (£14.8 million, 30.5%) and Wellcome Trust (£12.0 million, 24.7%). Preclinical studies received £42.2 million (87.3%), with clinical trials, intervention studies and implementation research in total receiving £6.2 million (12.7%). By institution, University of Aberdeen received most funding (£16.9 million, 35%). Studies investigating antifungal resistance received £1.5 million (3.2%).

Conclusions: There is little translation of preclinical research into clinical trials or implementation research in spite of substantial disease burden globally, and there are few UK institutions that carry out significant quantities of mycology research of any type. In the context of global health and the burden of disease in low-income countries, more investment is required for mycology research.
e004129-e004129
Head, M.G.
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Fitchett, J.R.
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Atun, R.
feb620b0-a662-4642-ba73-2ca4b7dae81a
May, R.C.
39779ddc-c86b-4a88-baa0-f72739edd27b
Head, M.G.
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Fitchett, J.R.
f8f56bf8-924d-40c0-b0b8-772c885a6c7a
Atun, R.
feb620b0-a662-4642-ba73-2ca4b7dae81a
May, R.C.
39779ddc-c86b-4a88-baa0-f72739edd27b

Head, M.G., Fitchett, J.R., Atun, R. and May, R.C. (2014) Systematic analysis of funding awarded for mycology research to institutions in the UK, 1997-2010. BMJ Open, 4 (1), e004129-e004129. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004129).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: Fungal infections cause significant global morbidity and mortality. We have previously described the UK investments in global infectious disease research, and here our objective is to describe the investments awarded to UK institutions for mycology research and outline potential funding gaps in the UK portfolio.

Design: Systematic analysis.

Setting: UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research.

Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcome is the amount of funding and number of studies related to mycology research. Secondary outcomes are describing the investments made to specific fungal pathogens and diseases, and also the type of science along the R&D value chain.

Methods: We systematically searched databases and websites for information on research studies from public and philanthropic funding institutions awarded between 1997 and 2010, and highlighted the mycology-related projects.

Results: Of 6165 funded studies, we identified 171 studies related to mycology (total investment £48.4 million, 1.9% of all infection research, with mean annual funding £3.5 million). Studies related to global health represented 5.1% of this funding (£2.4 million, compared with 35.6% of all infectious diseases). Leading funders were the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (£14.8 million, 30.5%) and Wellcome Trust (£12.0 million, 24.7%). Preclinical studies received £42.2 million (87.3%), with clinical trials, intervention studies and implementation research in total receiving £6.2 million (12.7%). By institution, University of Aberdeen received most funding (£16.9 million, 35%). Studies investigating antifungal resistance received £1.5 million (3.2%).

Conclusions: There is little translation of preclinical research into clinical trials or implementation research in spite of substantial disease burden globally, and there are few UK institutions that carry out significant quantities of mycology research of any type. In the context of global health and the burden of disease in low-income countries, more investment is required for mycology research.

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Accepted/In Press date: 15 November 2013
Published date: 9 January 2014
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387024
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387024
PURE UUID: d74d57be-0973-4e1a-aa5c-8ae55866c237
ORCID for M.G. Head: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1189-0531

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Date deposited: 17 Oct 2016 12:28
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:21

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