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Rate of establishing the gut microbiota in infancy has consequences for future health

Rate of establishing the gut microbiota in infancy has consequences for future health
Rate of establishing the gut microbiota in infancy has consequences for future health
The gut of the human neonate is colonized rapidly after birth from an early sparse and highly distinct microbiota to a more adult-like and convergent state, within 1 to 3 years. The progression of colonizing bacterial species is non-random. During the first months of life several shifts commonly occur in the species prevalent in our guts. Although the sequential progression of these species is remarkably consistent across individuals and geographies, there is inter-individual variation in the rate of progression. Our study and others suggest that the rate is influenced by environmental factors, and influences our future health. In this article, we review our recent contribution to cataloging the developing infant gut microbiota alongside other important recent studies. We suggest testable hypotheses that arise from this synthesis.
adiposity, caesarean section, defining/profiling gut microbiome, gestational age, gut microbiota, harnessing microbial strategies for treatment of human disease, immaturity, infancy, obesity, prematurity, vaginal delivery
1949-0976
321-325
Dogra, S.
31aee96e-9fe2-4830-ad6f-66229b61db0f
Sakwinska, O.
e5423954-ba96-4065-8a34-8520e2dbb6bc
Soh, S.E.
00a5ad13-4c5b-4fad-aaa9-d080d9aa63e8
Ngom-Bru, C.
6fcec9e5-28b8-46e8-8e98-33b5ad5fa528
Bruck, W.M.
ffed0190-4e58-4ca9-a186-afcbb81e8aa7
Berger, B.
cce2b705-e442-4625-9479-d463b0dd3827
Brussow, H.
a65d3836-9d3d-488f-b6a9-e3eb6edafc44
Karnani, N.
1f3bc109-4c37-4af3-9db9-ad09310e757b
Lee, Y.S.
829a41bb-945c-49cd-ad12-0f3d9c2782c6
Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452
Chong, Y.S.
b50c99c9-4d83-46c5-a1c7-23f9a553ab8a
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Holbrook, J.
9547340c-5911-41e8-bcce-585e501a1c7b
Dogra, S.
31aee96e-9fe2-4830-ad6f-66229b61db0f
Sakwinska, O.
e5423954-ba96-4065-8a34-8520e2dbb6bc
Soh, S.E.
00a5ad13-4c5b-4fad-aaa9-d080d9aa63e8
Ngom-Bru, C.
6fcec9e5-28b8-46e8-8e98-33b5ad5fa528
Bruck, W.M.
ffed0190-4e58-4ca9-a186-afcbb81e8aa7
Berger, B.
cce2b705-e442-4625-9479-d463b0dd3827
Brussow, H.
a65d3836-9d3d-488f-b6a9-e3eb6edafc44
Karnani, N.
1f3bc109-4c37-4af3-9db9-ad09310e757b
Lee, Y.S.
829a41bb-945c-49cd-ad12-0f3d9c2782c6
Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452
Chong, Y.S.
b50c99c9-4d83-46c5-a1c7-23f9a553ab8a
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Holbrook, J.
9547340c-5911-41e8-bcce-585e501a1c7b

Dogra, S., Sakwinska, O., Soh, S.E., Ngom-Bru, C., Bruck, W.M., Berger, B., Brussow, H., Karnani, N., Lee, Y.S., Yap, F., Chong, Y.S., Godfrey, K.M. and Holbrook, J. (2015) Rate of establishing the gut microbiota in infancy has consequences for future health. Gut Microbes, 6 (5), 321-325. (doi:10.1080/19490976.2015.1078051). (PMID:26516657)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The gut of the human neonate is colonized rapidly after birth from an early sparse and highly distinct microbiota to a more adult-like and convergent state, within 1 to 3 years. The progression of colonizing bacterial species is non-random. During the first months of life several shifts commonly occur in the species prevalent in our guts. Although the sequential progression of these species is remarkably consistent across individuals and geographies, there is inter-individual variation in the rate of progression. Our study and others suggest that the rate is influenced by environmental factors, and influences our future health. In this article, we review our recent contribution to cataloging the developing infant gut microbiota alongside other important recent studies. We suggest testable hypotheses that arise from this synthesis.

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19490976.2015.1078051 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 July 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 August 2015
Published date: September 2015
Keywords: adiposity, caesarean section, defining/profiling gut microbiome, gestational age, gut microbiota, harnessing microbial strategies for treatment of human disease, immaturity, infancy, obesity, prematurity, vaginal delivery
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387045
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387045
ISSN: 1949-0976
PURE UUID: 12d9f9d5-5e90-4cdf-8c3e-4b1bce35a04f
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 08 Feb 2016 11:23
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:35

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Contributors

Author: S. Dogra
Author: O. Sakwinska
Author: S.E. Soh
Author: C. Ngom-Bru
Author: W.M. Bruck
Author: B. Berger
Author: H. Brussow
Author: N. Karnani
Author: Y.S. Lee
Author: F. Yap
Author: Y.S. Chong
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: J. Holbrook

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