The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

English as an academic lingua franca and intercultural awareness: student mobility in the transcultural university

English as an academic lingua franca and intercultural awareness: student mobility in the transcultural university
English as an academic lingua franca and intercultural awareness: student mobility in the transcultural university
The increasingly international orientation of many higher education institutes and the growing role of English as an academic lingua franca have far reaching implications for how we conceptualise universities and student mobility. In this paper it is argued that the complexity and diversity of languages, communities and cultures present in many HE institutes mean we can no longer assume a connection between the language of instruction, a local host community and a national culture and language. This is particularly the case in English medium instruction programmes outside of Anglophones settings but also in international universities in Anglophone settings, both of which will be the focus of this paper. The term transcultural university is adopted to reflect this complexity and to move beyond nation based conceptions of universities. In educating students for mobility in such environments it is suggested that pedagogy needs to go beyond essentialist language, culture and nation correlations. Intercultural awareness is proposed as a crucial element in preparing students to negotiate the diversity and fluidity of communicative practices in transcultural universities in which mobile students need equally mobile communicative resources.
1470-8477
Baker, Will
9f1b758c-e6e0-43ca-b7bf-a0d5e1387d10
Baker, Will
9f1b758c-e6e0-43ca-b7bf-a0d5e1387d10

Baker, Will (2015) English as an academic lingua franca and intercultural awareness: student mobility in the transcultural university. Language and Intercultural Communication.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The increasingly international orientation of many higher education institutes and the growing role of English as an academic lingua franca have far reaching implications for how we conceptualise universities and student mobility. In this paper it is argued that the complexity and diversity of languages, communities and cultures present in many HE institutes mean we can no longer assume a connection between the language of instruction, a local host community and a national culture and language. This is particularly the case in English medium instruction programmes outside of Anglophones settings but also in international universities in Anglophone settings, both of which will be the focus of this paper. The term transcultural university is adopted to reflect this complexity and to move beyond nation based conceptions of universities. In educating students for mobility in such environments it is suggested that pedagogy needs to go beyond essentialist language, culture and nation correlations. Intercultural awareness is proposed as a crucial element in preparing students to negotiate the diversity and fluidity of communicative practices in transcultural universities in which mobile students need equally mobile communicative resources.

Other
ELFA and ICA revised eprints.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (57kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 November 2015
Organisations: Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387048
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387048
ISSN: 1470-8477
PURE UUID: 6f5b5f1b-8eac-4239-9497-1b8a64a63ce1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Feb 2016 11:54
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:29

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×