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A systematic review of supportive supervision as a strategy to improve primary healthcare services in Sub-Saharan Africa

A systematic review of supportive supervision as a strategy to improve primary healthcare services in Sub-Saharan Africa
A systematic review of supportive supervision as a strategy to improve primary healthcare services in Sub-Saharan Africa
Background: t may be assumed that supportive supervision effectively builds capacity, improves the quality of care provided by frontline health workers, and positively impacts clinical outcomes. Evidence on the role of supervision in Sub-Saharan Africa has been inconclusive, despite the critical need to maximize the workforce in low-resource settings.

Objectives: to review the published literature from Sub-Saharan Africa on the effects of supportive supervision on quality of care, and health worker motivation and performance.

Search strategy: a systematic review of seven databases of both qualitative and quantitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals.

Selection criteria: selected studies were based in primary healthcare settings in Sub-Saharan Africa and present primary data concerning supportive supervision.

Data collection and analysis: thematic synthesis where data from the identified studies were grouped and interpreted according to prominent themes.

Main results: supportive supervision can increase job satisfaction and health worker motivation. Evidence is mixed on whether this translates to increased clinical competence and there is little evidence of the effect on clinical outcomes.

Conclusions: results highlight the lack of sound evidence on the effects of supportive supervision owing to limitations in research design and the complexity of evaluating such interventions. The approaches required a high level of external inputs, which challenge the sustainability of such models.
0020-7292
117-125
Bailey, Claire
86bb941a-25b1-4c55-ba25-80c0dff7e327
Blake, Carolyn
d293f801-d8ca-4ae8-859d-d87edf2f0c87
Schriver, Michael
43d88db0-ce86-445a-886f-20218c2b8469
Kalumire Cubaka, Vincent
26e5549b-46b9-493e-b2f0-57b951848854
Thomas, Tisa
6122b2f7-dbf3-4424-901f-e76d0f2c9431
Martin Hilber, Adriane
1dd45dde-cb05-4c87-8659-172b781db8fb
Bailey, Claire
86bb941a-25b1-4c55-ba25-80c0dff7e327
Blake, Carolyn
d293f801-d8ca-4ae8-859d-d87edf2f0c87
Schriver, Michael
43d88db0-ce86-445a-886f-20218c2b8469
Kalumire Cubaka, Vincent
26e5549b-46b9-493e-b2f0-57b951848854
Thomas, Tisa
6122b2f7-dbf3-4424-901f-e76d0f2c9431
Martin Hilber, Adriane
1dd45dde-cb05-4c87-8659-172b781db8fb

Bailey, Claire, Blake, Carolyn, Schriver, Michael, Kalumire Cubaka, Vincent, Thomas, Tisa and Martin Hilber, Adriane (2016) A systematic review of supportive supervision as a strategy to improve primary healthcare services in Sub-Saharan Africa. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 132 (1), 117-125. (doi:10.1016/j.ijgo.2015.10.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: t may be assumed that supportive supervision effectively builds capacity, improves the quality of care provided by frontline health workers, and positively impacts clinical outcomes. Evidence on the role of supervision in Sub-Saharan Africa has been inconclusive, despite the critical need to maximize the workforce in low-resource settings.

Objectives: to review the published literature from Sub-Saharan Africa on the effects of supportive supervision on quality of care, and health worker motivation and performance.

Search strategy: a systematic review of seven databases of both qualitative and quantitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals.

Selection criteria: selected studies were based in primary healthcare settings in Sub-Saharan Africa and present primary data concerning supportive supervision.

Data collection and analysis: thematic synthesis where data from the identified studies were grouped and interpreted according to prominent themes.

Main results: supportive supervision can increase job satisfaction and health worker motivation. Evidence is mixed on whether this translates to increased clinical competence and there is little evidence of the effect on clinical outcomes.

Conclusions: results highlight the lack of sound evidence on the effects of supportive supervision owing to limitations in research design and the complexity of evaluating such interventions. The approaches required a high level of external inputs, which challenge the sustainability of such models.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: October 2015
Published date: January 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387161
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387161
ISSN: 0020-7292
PURE UUID: 9304c29d-1fc5-4f92-8d5c-1b8eb42faaa1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Feb 2016 15:54
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:44

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