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The developmental environment, epigenetic biomarkers and long-term health

The developmental environment, epigenetic biomarkers and long-term health
The developmental environment, epigenetic biomarkers and long-term health
Evidence from both human and animal studies has shown that the prenatal and early postnatal environments influence susceptibility to chronic disease in later life and suggests that epigenetic processes are an important mechanism by which the environment alters long-term disease risk. Epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, histone modification and non-coding RNAs, play a central role in regulating gene expression. The epigenome is highly sensitive to environmental factors in early life, such as nutrition, stress, endocrine disruption and pollution, and changes in the epigenome can induce long-term changes in gene expression and phenotype. In this review we focus on how the early life nutritional environment can alter the epigenome leading to an altered susceptibility to disease in later life.
developmental environment, dna methylation, epigenetics, nutrition
399-406
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Costello, P.M.
8fc5c643-2d38-4443-975a-8704af2fa755
Lillycrop, K.A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Costello, P.M.
8fc5c643-2d38-4443-975a-8704af2fa755
Lillycrop, K.A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc

Godfrey, K.M., Costello, P.M. and Lillycrop, K.A. (2015) The developmental environment, epigenetic biomarkers and long-term health. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 6 (5), 399-406. (doi:10.1017/S204017441500121X). (PMID:26017068)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Evidence from both human and animal studies has shown that the prenatal and early postnatal environments influence susceptibility to chronic disease in later life and suggests that epigenetic processes are an important mechanism by which the environment alters long-term disease risk. Epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, histone modification and non-coding RNAs, play a central role in regulating gene expression. The epigenome is highly sensitive to environmental factors in early life, such as nutrition, stress, endocrine disruption and pollution, and changes in the epigenome can induce long-term changes in gene expression and phenotype. In this review we focus on how the early life nutritional environment can alter the epigenome leading to an altered susceptibility to disease in later life.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 May 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 May 2015
Published date: October 2015
Keywords: developmental environment, dna methylation, epigenetics, nutrition
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 387231
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387231
PURE UUID: 9d224feb-dd5f-45ae-b7a5-f8e4c4d4ebe1
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for K.A. Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489

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Date deposited: 16 Feb 2016 16:29
Last modified: 17 Apr 2021 01:36

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Contributors

Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: P.M. Costello
Author: K.A. Lillycrop ORCID iD

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