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The shifting landscape of prime ministerial accountability to parliament: an analysis of Liaison Committee scrutiny sessions

The shifting landscape of prime ministerial accountability to parliament: an analysis of Liaison Committee scrutiny sessions
The shifting landscape of prime ministerial accountability to parliament: an analysis of Liaison Committee scrutiny sessions
Prime ministerial power is always contingent, based on the utilisation of personal and institutional resources, subject to various formal and informal constraints. Parliament is both a political resource to be utilised, but also a veto-player. In the absence of formal mechanisms setting out the requirements for UK prime ministerial accountability to parliament, a fluid and essentially personalised relationship has developed. Regular prime ministerial appearances before the House of Commons Liaison Committee, begun in 2002, have added to parliament’s scrutiny toolkit. This article considers the accountability of the prime minister to parliament by analysing the emergence and development of the Liaison Committee evidence sessions, and draws on interviews with participants and examination of the session transcripts, in order to assess the value of this scrutiny mechanism within the broader framework of prime ministerial-legislative relations
Kelso, Alexandra
e9f198bb-27f8-412a-9360-aff01d578096
Bennister, Mark
b8e304d5-67a2-44a5-a2c0-d9b6344167e7
Larkin, Phil
301e499b-f9a8-4e4b-9ab4-7af2e8fc411e
Kelso, Alexandra
e9f198bb-27f8-412a-9360-aff01d578096
Bennister, Mark
b8e304d5-67a2-44a5-a2c0-d9b6344167e7
Larkin, Phil
301e499b-f9a8-4e4b-9ab4-7af2e8fc411e

Kelso, Alexandra, Bennister, Mark and Larkin, Phil (2016) The shifting landscape of prime ministerial accountability to parliament: an analysis of Liaison Committee scrutiny sessions. The British Journal of Politics and International Relations. (doi:10.1177/1369148116633438).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Prime ministerial power is always contingent, based on the utilisation of personal and institutional resources, subject to various formal and informal constraints. Parliament is both a political resource to be utilised, but also a veto-player. In the absence of formal mechanisms setting out the requirements for UK prime ministerial accountability to parliament, a fluid and essentially personalised relationship has developed. Regular prime ministerial appearances before the House of Commons Liaison Committee, begun in 2002, have added to parliament’s scrutiny toolkit. This article considers the accountability of the prime minister to parliament by analysing the emergence and development of the Liaison Committee evidence sessions, and draws on interviews with participants and examination of the session transcripts, in order to assess the value of this scrutiny mechanism within the broader framework of prime ministerial-legislative relations

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Accepted/In Press date: 21 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 May 2016
Published date: August 2016
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

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Local EPrints ID: 387232
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387232
PURE UUID: d98b7b14-2db8-40e9-b20d-584f67ca5df3

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Date deposited: 18 Feb 2016 14:16
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 05:23

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Contributors

Author: Alexandra Kelso
Author: Mark Bennister
Author: Phil Larkin

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