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Extravagance in the commons: resource exploitation and the frontiers of ecosystem service depletion in the Amazon estuary

Extravagance in the commons: resource exploitation and the frontiers of ecosystem service depletion in the Amazon estuary
Extravagance in the commons: resource exploitation and the frontiers of ecosystem service depletion in the Amazon estuary
Estuaries hold major economic potential due their strategic location, close to seas and inland waterways, thereby supporting intense economic activity. The increasing pace of human development in coastal deltas over the past five decades has also strained local resources and produced extensive changes across both social and ecological systems. The Amazon estuary is located in the Amazon Basin, North Brazil, the largest river basin on Earth and also one of the least understood. A considerable segment of the population living in the estuary is directly dependent on the local extraction of natural resources for their livelihood. Areas sparsely inhabited may be exploited with few negative consequences for the environment. However, recent and increasing pressure on ecosystem services is maximised by a combination of factors such as governance, currency exchange rates, exports of beef and forest products. Here we present a cross methodological approach in identifying the political frontiers of forest cover change in the estuary with consequences for ecosystem services loss. We used a combination of data from earth observation satellites, ecosystem service literature, and official government statistics to produce spatially-explicit relationships linking the Green Vegetation Cover to the availability of ecosystems provided by forests in the estuary. Our results show that the continuous changes in land use/cover and in the economic state have contributed significantly to changes in key ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration, climate regulation, and the availability of timber over the last thirty years.
amazon estuary, ecosystem services, natural resource exploitation, granger causality
0048-9697
6-16
de Araujo Barbosa, C.C.
5b42b461-3f41-4cb2-92ee-46ac19f47d57
Atkinson, P.M.
96e96579-56fe-424d-a21c-17b6eed13b0b
Dearing, J.A.
dff37300-b8a6-4406-ad84-89aa01de03d7
de Araujo Barbosa, C.C.
5b42b461-3f41-4cb2-92ee-46ac19f47d57
Atkinson, P.M.
96e96579-56fe-424d-a21c-17b6eed13b0b
Dearing, J.A.
dff37300-b8a6-4406-ad84-89aa01de03d7

de Araujo Barbosa, C.C., Atkinson, P.M. and Dearing, J.A. (2016) Extravagance in the commons: resource exploitation and the frontiers of ecosystem service depletion in the Amazon estuary. Science of the Total Environment, 550, 6-16. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.01.072).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Estuaries hold major economic potential due their strategic location, close to seas and inland waterways, thereby supporting intense economic activity. The increasing pace of human development in coastal deltas over the past five decades has also strained local resources and produced extensive changes across both social and ecological systems. The Amazon estuary is located in the Amazon Basin, North Brazil, the largest river basin on Earth and also one of the least understood. A considerable segment of the population living in the estuary is directly dependent on the local extraction of natural resources for their livelihood. Areas sparsely inhabited may be exploited with few negative consequences for the environment. However, recent and increasing pressure on ecosystem services is maximised by a combination of factors such as governance, currency exchange rates, exports of beef and forest products. Here we present a cross methodological approach in identifying the political frontiers of forest cover change in the estuary with consequences for ecosystem services loss. We used a combination of data from earth observation satellites, ecosystem service literature, and official government statistics to produce spatially-explicit relationships linking the Green Vegetation Cover to the availability of ecosystems provided by forests in the estuary. Our results show that the continuous changes in land use/cover and in the economic state have contributed significantly to changes in key ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration, climate regulation, and the availability of timber over the last thirty years.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 January 2016
Published date: 15 April 2016
Keywords: amazon estuary, ecosystem services, natural resource exploitation, granger causality
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387364
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387364
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: 1dd51860-d913-4b05-890f-74bc1bfdf429
ORCID for P.M. Atkinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5489-6880
ORCID for J.A. Dearing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1466-9640

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Feb 2016 09:59
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 02:02

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