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Microbial diversity in hummock and hollow soils of three wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau revealed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing

Microbial diversity in hummock and hollow soils of three wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau revealed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing
Microbial diversity in hummock and hollow soils of three wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau revealed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing
The wetlands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are believed to play an important role in global nutrient cycling, but the composition and diversity of microorganisms in this ecosystem are poorly characterized. An understanding of the effects of geography and microtopography on microbial populations will provide clues to the underlying mechanisms that structure microbial communities. In this study, we used pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences to assess and compare the composition of soil microbial communities present in hummock and hollow soils from three wetlands (Dangxiong, Hongyuan and Maduo) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the world’s highest plateau. A total of 36 bacterial phyla were detected. Proteobacteria (34.5% average relative abundance), Actinobacteria (17.3%) and Bacteroidetes (11%) had the highest relative abundances across all sites. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, and Planctomycetes were also relatively abundant (1–10%). In addition, archaeal sequences belonging to Euryarchaea, Crenarchaea and Thaumarchaea were detected. Alphaproteobacteria sequences, especially of the order Rhodospirillales, were significantly more abundant in Maduo than Hongyuan and Dangxiong wetlands. Compared with Hongyuan soils, Dangxiong and Maduo had significantly higher relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria sequences (mainly order Xanthomonadales). Hongyuan wetland had a relatively high abundance of methanogens (mainly genera Methanobacterium, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta) and methanotrophs (mainly Methylocystis) compared with the other two wetlands. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) indicated that the microbial community structure differed between locations and microtopographies and canonical correspondence analysis indicated an association between microbial community structure and soil properties or geography. These insights into the microbial community structure and the main controlling factors in wetlands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau provide a valuable background for further studies on biogeochemical processes in this distinct ecosystem.
1932-6203
1-10
Deng, Yongcui
5823c5fe-5a0d-4002-972c-48882272a423
Cui, Xiaoyong
9b655f98-cd9a-4e49-8ec2-9a061a31a878
Hernandez Garcia, Marcela
e73477e7-cf3e-4f50-97c8-4494c5b05cd0
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Deng, Yongcui
5823c5fe-5a0d-4002-972c-48882272a423
Cui, Xiaoyong
9b655f98-cd9a-4e49-8ec2-9a061a31a878
Hernandez Garcia, Marcela
e73477e7-cf3e-4f50-97c8-4494c5b05cd0
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511

Deng, Yongcui, Cui, Xiaoyong, Hernandez Garcia, Marcela and Dumont, Marc (2014) Microbial diversity in hummock and hollow soils of three wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau revealed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. PLoS ONE, 9 (7), 1-10. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103115). (PMID:25078273)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The wetlands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are believed to play an important role in global nutrient cycling, but the composition and diversity of microorganisms in this ecosystem are poorly characterized. An understanding of the effects of geography and microtopography on microbial populations will provide clues to the underlying mechanisms that structure microbial communities. In this study, we used pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences to assess and compare the composition of soil microbial communities present in hummock and hollow soils from three wetlands (Dangxiong, Hongyuan and Maduo) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the world’s highest plateau. A total of 36 bacterial phyla were detected. Proteobacteria (34.5% average relative abundance), Actinobacteria (17.3%) and Bacteroidetes (11%) had the highest relative abundances across all sites. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, and Planctomycetes were also relatively abundant (1–10%). In addition, archaeal sequences belonging to Euryarchaea, Crenarchaea and Thaumarchaea were detected. Alphaproteobacteria sequences, especially of the order Rhodospirillales, were significantly more abundant in Maduo than Hongyuan and Dangxiong wetlands. Compared with Hongyuan soils, Dangxiong and Maduo had significantly higher relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria sequences (mainly order Xanthomonadales). Hongyuan wetland had a relatively high abundance of methanogens (mainly genera Methanobacterium, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta) and methanotrophs (mainly Methylocystis) compared with the other two wetlands. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) indicated that the microbial community structure differed between locations and microtopographies and canonical correspondence analysis indicated an association between microbial community structure and soil properties or geography. These insights into the microbial community structure and the main controlling factors in wetlands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau provide a valuable background for further studies on biogeochemical processes in this distinct ecosystem.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 June 2014
Published date: 31 July 2014
Organisations: Environmental, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387923
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387923
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: b8c177ed-6100-4a4f-84e1-4ee6b06ce8f9
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

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Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 15:48
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:32

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