The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Stable isotope probing — linking microbial identity to function

Stable isotope probing — linking microbial identity to function
Stable isotope probing — linking microbial identity to function
Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a technique that is used to identify the microorganisms in environmental samples that use a particular growth substrate. The method relies on the incorporation of a substrate that is highly enriched in a stable isotope, such as 13C, and the identification of active microorganisms by the selective recovery and analysis of isotope-enriched cellular components. DNA and rRNA are the most informative taxonomic biomarkers and 13C-labelled molecules can be purified from unlabelled nucleic acid by density-gradient centrifugation. The future holds great promise for SIP, particularly when combined with other emerging technologies such as microarrays and metagenomics
1740-1526
499-504
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Murrell, J. Colin
22f4dcaa-2fab-4b88-9365-0418bae53ec9
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Murrell, J. Colin
22f4dcaa-2fab-4b88-9365-0418bae53ec9

Dumont, Marc and Murrell, J. Colin (2005) Stable isotope probing — linking microbial identity to function. Nature Reviews Microbiology, 3 (6), 499-504. (doi:10.1038/nrmicro1162).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a technique that is used to identify the microorganisms in environmental samples that use a particular growth substrate. The method relies on the incorporation of a substrate that is highly enriched in a stable isotope, such as 13C, and the identification of active microorganisms by the selective recovery and analysis of isotope-enriched cellular components. DNA and rRNA are the most informative taxonomic biomarkers and 13C-labelled molecules can be purified from unlabelled nucleic acid by density-gradient centrifugation. The future holds great promise for SIP, particularly when combined with other emerging technologies such as microarrays and metagenomics

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: June 2005
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387954
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387954
ISSN: 1740-1526
PURE UUID: e337e76c-bdc0-45fa-9ba0-5b7d7e8f65b1
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Jun 2016 12:50
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×