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Mobility and migration in late Iron Age and early Medieval Ireland

Mobility and migration in late Iron Age and early Medieval Ireland
Mobility and migration in late Iron Age and early Medieval Ireland
Strontium and oxygen isotope analysis has been performed on a selection of human teeth dating from late Iron Age and early Medieval Ireland to test the hypothesis that the appearance of new burial rites was associated with phases of migration from, and contact with, the Roman and Late Antique world. In particular, the appearance of crouched inhumations from the beginning of the 1st century CE, and the appearance of extended supine inhumations alongside the reappearance of crouched burials after the c. 4th century CE are investigated. Isotopic data favours the presence of non-local individuals during both periods. As parallels for virtually all of these new burial practices can be found elsewhere, for example throughout Iron Age and Roman Britain, the data are seen to support previously proposed theories that such burial practices were intrusive and reflected new rites associated with migrant peoples. This adds to the increasing body of evidence demonstrating that rather than being isolated, Ireland was very much part of a connected Europe throughout the entire period of Roman administration in the western provinces, and in the centuries after its demise.
ireland, mobility, migration, late iron age, early medieval, roman
2352-409X
230-241
Cahill Wilson, J.
843d36ff-a05f-4b8b-96d5-bd1258011e0d
Standish, C.D.
0b996271-da5d-4c4f-9e05-a2ec90e8561d
Cahill Wilson, J.
843d36ff-a05f-4b8b-96d5-bd1258011e0d
Standish, C.D.
0b996271-da5d-4c4f-9e05-a2ec90e8561d

Cahill Wilson, J. and Standish, C.D. (2016) Mobility and migration in late Iron Age and early Medieval Ireland. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 6, 230-241. (doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.02.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Strontium and oxygen isotope analysis has been performed on a selection of human teeth dating from late Iron Age and early Medieval Ireland to test the hypothesis that the appearance of new burial rites was associated with phases of migration from, and contact with, the Roman and Late Antique world. In particular, the appearance of crouched inhumations from the beginning of the 1st century CE, and the appearance of extended supine inhumations alongside the reappearance of crouched burials after the c. 4th century CE are investigated. Isotopic data favours the presence of non-local individuals during both periods. As parallels for virtually all of these new burial practices can be found elsewhere, for example throughout Iron Age and Roman Britain, the data are seen to support previously proposed theories that such burial practices were intrusive and reflected new rites associated with migrant peoples. This adds to the increasing body of evidence demonstrating that rather than being isolated, Ireland was very much part of a connected Europe throughout the entire period of Roman administration in the western provinces, and in the centuries after its demise.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 February 2016
Published date: April 2016
Keywords: ireland, mobility, migration, late iron age, early medieval, roman
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388167
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388167
ISSN: 2352-409X
PURE UUID: cf156678-14c9-40f8-9966-6e9bc75f5678

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Feb 2016 14:31
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:45

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Contributors

Author: J. Cahill Wilson
Author: C.D. Standish

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