Why self-enhancement provokes dislike: The hubris hypothesis and the aversiveness of explicit self-superiority claims


Van Damme, C., Hoorens, V. and Sedikides, C. (2015) Why self-enhancement provokes dislike: The hubris hypothesis and the aversiveness of explicit self-superiority claims Self and Identity, 15, (2), pp. 173-190. (doi:10.1080/15298868.2015.1095232).

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Description/Abstract

Most people believe that they are in many respects superior to others. When they publicly express their superiority, they may do so in an explicitly or implicitly comparative manner (“I am better than others” vs. “I am good”). According to the hubris hypothesis, observers dislike explicit self-superiority claims, because these suggest a negative view of others and hence of the observers. The results of two experiments were consistent with the hubris hypothesis. Participants evaluated explicit self-superiority claimants more unfavorably than implicit self-superiority claimants (Experiments 1–2). They attributed less warmth, but not less competence, to explicit than implicit self-superiority claimants (Experiment 2), and this occurred to the extent that participants inferred a negative view of others (Experiments 1–2) and hence of them (Experiment 2).

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1080/15298868.2015.1095232
ISSNs: 1529-8868 (print)
Keywords: self-enhancement, superiority, self-presentation, social comparison, hubris hypothesis
ePrint ID: 388225
Date :
Date Event
14 September 2015Accepted/In Press
10 November 2015e-pub ahead of print
February 2016Published
Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2016 16:42
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2017 04:06
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388225

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